Woman shows process of cleaning a home after 21 years of cigarette smoke
Woman shows process of cleaning a home after 21 years of cigarette smoke

Viral TikTok shows before-and-after cleaning of home from 21 years of cigarette smoke

‘I would just throw the whole house away,’ one viewer commented

Chelsea Ritschel
New York
Saturday 13 March 2021 18:46
Comments

A professional cleaner has gone viral on TikTok after sharing clips of the cleaning process to remove stains and discolouration from the inside of a home after it was exposed to 21 years of cigarette smoke.

This week, Duranda Rose, who goes by the username @camelgum, shared multiple clips of the house on TikTok, where she revealed that she has “never seen anything like this”.

In the first clip, which has since been viewed more than 17.6m times, Rose films as a man wipes the yellowish-brown walls only to unveil white paint, and later pours the discoloured water down the drain.

The video also sees Rose show the home’s carpet, which is covered in cigarette burns and ash, as well as the discoloured ceilings and floors of the house.

In what appears to be the kitchen, the linoleum flooring can be seen turned a dark yellow colour, with cleared portions of the floor showing a white and grey tile underneath.

Read more: Woman finds an entire apartment behind her bathroom mirror in viral TikTok

“21 years of cig smoke,” Rose captioned the clip, before sharing an additional TikTok showing the cleaning process, revealing at one point her shock that the house didn’t “burn down”.

@camelgum

🤢🤢🤢 Never seen anything like this!!!! ##fyp ##gross ##nasty ##shocking

♬ Uh Oh Stinky - Merlin

The tar-like stains are also apparent on the home’s refrigerator, which are wiped clean by a man in one of the videos, while Rose revealed in the most recent video that she and her team are “getting there” but that the cigarette tar “keeps seeping back out”.

The videos have prompted thousands of comments from people horrified by the state of the home and the effects of the cigarette smoke, with many pointing out that the same thing happens inside a smoker’s lungs.

“If it does this to a house, imagine their lungs,” one person commented, while another said: “Oof another reason why a smoker is a deal-breaker.”

Others have questioned how Rose is cleaning the house, with some suggesting that the smell will linger forever.

“I can already tell that that house will never smell okay again. Even after painting the walls, changing the carpet and bleaching everything, it always smells,” someone else wrote.

However, according to Rose, she and her team will bring in ozone machines after they have finished cleaning that will “break apart oxygen molecules and kill the odour”.

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