Worker reveals why they quit job after company offered a $25,000 raise: ‘Loyalty is dead’

‘Why would I want to stay at a company that so obviously underpaid me for years?’

An employee has revealed that after quitting their job, they turned down a $25,000 pay increase to stay at their company.

In a recent post to the popular Subreddit “Work Reform,” a Reddit user who has since deleted their account explained that it was their “last day” at their job, as they were moving on to another position with a higher salary. However, when the worker gave their boss a “two-week notice,” their employer offered a very huge raise, “on the spot”.

“Today was my last day at a job, after I received an offer for a similar position at another company making $35,000 more,” the post reads. “When I gave my two weeks notice and told my boss why, he offered me a $25,000 pay bump on the spot.”

The employee acknowledged how the company had been underpaying them “for years,” despite the new salary, so they “declined” the offer.

“Basically a 33 per cent bump for doing the exact same thing I was already doing,” the original poster wrote. “I declined- Why would I want to stay at a company that so obviously underpaid me for years?”

“Loyalty is dead,” the post concluded. “From now on I’m getting my d**n money.”

Although the worker didn’t specify what career field their in, they said in the comments that they worked at a “small company” and didn’t want to “burn the bridge”.

Along with “low pay,” they gave their company “other reasons” why they were leaving. They also said that they told their co-workers about the pay and benefits they would have, if they stayed at the company.

As of 15 April, the Reddit post has more than 13,900 upvotes, as readers praised the employee for declining the offer and questioned the company’s loyalty.

“Good on you!!” one Reddit user wrote. “If it takes long for them to realise your worth… and only when you resign, despite your good work ethics, don’t bother with them.”

“Loyalty isn’t valued anymore,” another reader claimed. “There are no raises for staying, just the bare minimum to keep talent.”

Many readers also questioned the company as a whole, since they hadn’t offered the employee a higher salary until they decided to quit.

“[Giving] $25K bump ON THE SPOT, that meant that they also knew they had the funds and that they could allocate it to salary,” another reader wrote. “They didn’t need a week to look at the numbers and see if they jiggled things [so] they could swing it.”

“Good for you!” one comment reads. “Also, f*** your boss. ‘Well, we know we’ve been underpaying you, so we’re going to keep doing that by offering $10k less than you know you’re getting elsewhere.’ What an a**hole

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