TTIP: US trade deal could weaken EU regulation

“Europe must retain its right to regulate"

Emily Beament
Tuesday 10 March 2015 01:12
Comments
A woman demonstrates in central London in October, against the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP)
A woman demonstrates in central London in October, against the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP)

A controversial trade deal being negotiated between the European Union and the United States risks an unacceptable “race to the bottom” on environmental standards, MPs have warned.

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) could weaken European and UK regulation in areas including genetically modified crops, chemicals in cosmetics and meat treated with growth hormones, as a result of efforts to align standards between the US, where rules are laxer, and the EU.

A report by the parliamentary Environmental Audit Committee also suggested it could make it harder to strengthen rules on issues such as animal welfare or climate change – particularly if the deal allows US companies to sue governments for bringing in new regulations that harm their business.

The Government maintains it would give a huge boost to business, creating jobs, cutting red tape and opening up new markets.

Committee chairwoman Joan Walley said: “Europe must retain its right to regulate. That needs to be embedded in any treaty text.”

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in