BBC defends staffing levels at key events

Vicky Shaw,Press Association
Tuesday 22 June 2010 12:37
Comments

The BBC today defended its staffing levels for the World Cup, Wimbledon and Glastonbury, saying such events help in "bringing the nation together".

The corporation said the total number of BBC staff it was sending to the three events was 751 and each person had a "clear and accountable role".

The BBC described the World Cup as one of the most complex productions it has undertaken in terms of the geographical spread of the event across South Africa, the logistical challenges and security issues.

The corporation said that of the 292 staff sent to the event, covering sport television production, BBC interactive, Radio 5 Live, online and news, around 35 would go home early and numbers could reduce further, depending on England's progress.

Nicky Campbell is hosting his Radio 5 Live show from South Africa.

A spokesman for the station said of Campbell's move: "BBC Radio 5 Live's remit is to cover news and sport and Nicky Campbell presents 5 Live Breakfast - our biggest programme.

"The World Cup is a massive international event and we believe listeners want the fullest and best coverage of it.

"Nicky has a crucial role in telling the World Cup story such as his broadcast from Soweto, a programme that was very well received by the audience."

Around 185 BBC staff are covering the Wimbledon tennis championships, working on TV, radio, news, red button, online, and for the nations and regions.

The BBC is also putting in place 274 BBC staff and freelancers to cover this weekend's Glastonbury festival, plus around 130 contractors working at Glastonbury.

It said this will produce around 150 hours of television coverage, 60 hours of radio output and a "comprehensive" website featuring around 170 hours of video.

A BBC spokeswoman said: "Large scale live music and sport events are an important part of bringing the nation together and audiences expect to see and hear them on the BBC.

"In delivering these events, we always keep value for money in mind and each member of staff working at these events has a clear and accountable role."

In January, the National Audit Office (NAO) found the BBC had not done enough to show that its coverage of major sporting and music events provided the best possible value for money.

The NAO called for the corporation to improve how it commissions coverage and evaluates success, with a more structured approach.

Matthew Elliott of the TaxPayers' Alliance told the Daily Mail that the BBC had to cut back on spending "given the wider budget crisis".

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in