Bono bicycle accident: U2 singer undergoes five hours of facial and reconstructive surgery

The 54-year-old singer's worst injuries were a “facial fracture involving the orbit of his eye” and a bone “tearing through his skin”

Jenn Selby
Wednesday 19 November 2014 13:51
Comments
Bono at an event in November 2014
Bono at an event in November 2014

In the latest episode of "Bono gets stuck in Final Destination loop", the full extent of the injuries he suffered after falling from his bike in New York on Sunday have been disclosed.

The U2 frontman was forced to undergo a gruelling five hours of reconstructive surgery to repair facial fractures, a shattered shoulder and a broken arm.

The 54-year-old singer was rushed to hospital after the “high energy bicycle accident” in Central Park. After numerous X-rays and a CAT scan, he was left needing three metal plates and 18 screws to patch up the damage – the worst of which included a “facial fracture involving the orbit of his eye” and a bone “tearing through his skin”.

Dean Lorich, Bono’s Orthopaedic trauma surgeon, told Rolling Stone magazine: “He was taken emergently to the operating room where the elbow was washed out and debrided.

“A nerve trapped in the break was moved and the bone was repaired with three metal plates and 18 screws.”

He returned to the New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center the day afterwards to have his little finger reconstructed by surgeons.

Doctors expect the musician to make a full recovery, but only after intensive therapy.

The accident, which saw the premature termination of the band’s week-long residency on NBC's The Tonight Show, happened a day after Bono had jetted to London to record his line of the Band Aid 30 single, which aims to raise money to combat the spread of Ebola in West Africa.

Bono records his line for Band Aid 30

It also happened days after he narrowly avoided a mid-flight disaster when the door fell off the private jet he was travelling in, scattering his and his friends’ luggage somewhere over Germany.

Bono was making a two-hour trip from Dublin to Berlin on board a Learjet 60 D-CGEO with four friends heading to the Bambi International Music awards when the accident apparently took place.

When the aircraft reached the German coast, the tailgate at the rear of the plane became detached.

“He was extremely lucky, the plane could have gone down” a source is quoted in the Irish Daily Mail as saying.

“About an hour into the journey they heard a big thud coming from the rear of the plane.

“They were startled for a bit but they continued on and made the descent into Berlin airport.

“When they landed they were horrified to learn that the compartment at the rear of the plane had completely detached.

“The entire door along with Bono and his companions’ luggage had fallen out mid-air. They don’t know if the door and the contents landed over water or land but they were extremely lucky.

“They were at an altitude where anything could have happened and they are all feeling very lucky to be alive.”

Authorities at the airport in Berlin confirmed to the publication that the jet had landed with a damaged tailgate.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in