The Independent’s journalism is supported by our readers. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn commission.

Snowden director Oliver Stone asks 'how many Muslim countries has Obama bombed?' in scathing criticism

'How many drone strikes have we used, killing how many people?'

Heather Saul
Wednesday 12 October 2016 17:23
Comments

Oliver Stone has issued a blistering attack on President Barack Obama’s legacy in the White House, questioning how many Muslim countries have been bombed under his watch during his two terms in office.

The director of the biopic about the fugitive NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden has been a vocal critic of the surveillance which has taken place under the Obama administration. In August, he accused Mr Obama of creating a global security surveillance state “way beyond East Germany's Stasi”.

This week, Stone, 70, accused Mr Obama of quietly transforming into “a better version of Bush” as soon as he became President, according to AFP.

“How many wars is America in informally without consent?," he was quoted as asking a press conference promoting the release of Snowden in Europe and Asia. “How many Muslim countries has Obama bombed? How many drone strikes have we used, killing how many people?”

The Nobel Peace Prize committee’s decision to award Mr Obama the prize in 2009 was shrouded in controversy. Mr Obama oversaw the first US air strikes launched in Syria in 2014 in a huge escalation of America’s military campaign against the Isis terror group. Six years after coming to office he had approved military operations in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia, Yemen and Libya, becoming the Peace President to bomb seven countries in six years.

Mr Obama 

The Bureau of Investigative Journalism (BIJ) estimates the Obama administration has launched more than 390 drone strikes in five years across Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia – eight times as many approved during the entire Bush Presidency.

Stone also urged US citizens to be less apathetic towards the revelations from Snowden’s whistleblowing, warning they had been lulled into a false sense of security about the existence of their human freedoms.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in