Police on 'poo watch' as suspected gangster accused of swallowing drugs refuses to go to toilet for three weeks

Force applies to court to keep alleged dealer in custody until he empties bowels

Man suspected of swallowing drugs wins stand-off with police after refusing to use toilet for 47 days

A suspected drug dealer that police believe swallowed his stash has spent more than three weeks in custody refusing to go to the toilet.

Essex Police officers have been tweeting daily updates of operation they described as “poo watch” since the man was arrested in Harlow on 17 January.

He has been charged with two counts of possessing class A drugs with intent to supply.

Police said they would continue to apply to court for custody extensions until the empties his bowels or allows doctors to retrieve the package he is supected of swallowing.

The suspect was arrested by officers from the force’s Operation Raptor West; the gangs and urban street crime unit for Harlow, Epping Forest, Brentwood and Thurrock.

"Day 21 for our man on #poowatch and still no movements/items to report,” tweeted the unit on Wednesday. “He will remain with us until Friday when we are back at court where we will be requesting a further eight days should he not produce anything before that hearing.”

Officers added the next day: "Day 22 and male has still not used the toilet."

Police have been to court three times since the suspect’s arrest to apply for custody extensions.

“Male doesn’t seem to understand that eventually he will need/have to go,” officers wrote on day 19.

Police said the man had been refusing food and received daily check-ups from doctors. He was being “constantly watched” by two officers, they added.

“This is his own choice and so far his health is fine,” said the force.

Officers described the man as “delaying the inevitable”, posting a picture an emoji poo.

The suspect is alleged to have been in possession of crack cocaine and heroin. Police believe he is involved in a London gang.

Chief Superintendent Paul Wells, Essex Police’s lead for Operation Raptor, said: “Drug dealing and a gang lifestyle is not glamorous.

“You’ll be exploited, be the victim or perpetrator of violence, you’ll spend your days wondering whether a rival dealer or police officer will find you first.

“You’ll be expected to courier and deliver drugs and that might involve you swallowing or carrying them inside you, which is particularly dangerous.

“If you are arrested and suspected of having drugs inside you, we can and will keep you in custody until you produce them.

“It’s important that Essex Police continues to highlight the reality around drug and gang-related crime.”

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