Charlie Gard: Parents of sick baby lose appeal at European Court of Human Rights

After losing legal battles in the UK courts the couple took their fight to the Strasbourg judges

Cathy Gordon,Brian Farmer
Tuesday 27 June 2017 17:32
Comments
Chris Gard and Connie Yates lost their appeal for their son Charlie, who suffers from a rare genetic condition and has brain damage
Chris Gard and Connie Yates lost their appeal for their son Charlie, who suffers from a rare genetic condition and has brain damage

Judges in the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) have rejected a plea from the parents of terminally-ill baby Charlie Gard to intervene in the case.

Chris Gard and Connie Yates, who are in their 30s and come from Bedfont, west London, wanted 10-month-old Charlie, who suffers from a rare genetic condition and has brain damage, to undergo a therapy trial in America.

But specialists at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, where Charlie is being cared for, say the therapy proposed by a doctor in the US is experimental and will not help the child.

'A picture speaks a thousand words,' says Connie Yates (Facebook / Connie Yates)

After losing legal battles in the UK courts the couple then took their fight to the Strasbourg judges.

On Tuesday the ECHR announced the application to the court by the parents was "inadmissible" and said their decision was "final".

A fundraising appeal to pay for Charlie’s treatment in the US has raised more than £1.3m.

The couple launched an appeal on a GoFundMe website four months ago, saying they needed £1.2 million.

They reached their target shortly before a High Court trial began in April, and more than 83,000 people have donated money.

Charlie's mother, Connie Yates, has already indicated - on the GoFundMe website - what will happen to the money raised if they cannot take him to the US and life support treatment ends.

"A few people have asked us what we'll do if we don't win the court case," she has said.

"We have thought long and hard about it and we would set up a charity for mitochondrial depletion syndromes (there are others that are more common than Charlie's specific gene).

"We'd like to save other babies and children because these medications have been proven to work and we honestly have so much belief in them.

"If Charlie doesn't get this chance, we will make sure that other innocent babies and children will be saved."

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in