Donald Trump baby blimp to get final resting place at Museum of London

It first ascended over central London, above Parliament Square, during protests over Mr Trump and his state visit to the UK

Related video: We spent the day with the giant Trump baby blimp

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The infamous Donald Trump baby blimp, originally a large part of the protest against his state visit to the UK, as been consigned to history – at a museum.

The giant inflatable is a depiction of Mr Trump as a baby, with a nappy and mobile phone, and was first flown over Trafalgar Square on 13 July, 2018.

Now, following its travels around the world being seen by a global audience, the Trump Baby Blimp will head to its new home of the Museum of London, which announced in 2019 that it was in talks to acquire the 20ft orange effigy for its protest collection

It will be conserved and potentially displayed in years to come.

The creators of the famous effigy said they hoped it served as a reminder of the plight against the "politics of hate".

"While we're pleased that the Trump Baby can now be consigned to history along with the man himself, we're under no illusions that this is the end of the story," they said in a statement to the PA news agency.

"We hope the baby's place in the museum will stand as a reminder of when London stood against Mr Trump – but will prompt those who see it to examine how they can continue the fight against the politics of hate.

"Most of all we hope the Trump Baby serves as a reminder of the politics of resistance that took place during Trump's time in office."

Sharon Ament, the museum's director, said the organisation became "determined" to acquire the object in 2018.

"We did not know then what would transpire," she told PA.

"Of course the museum is not political and does not have any view about the state of politics in the States."

But the blimp does encapsulate the very British response to politics – satire – she added.

"We use humour a lot. And we poke fun at politicians. This is a big, literally, example of that.

"To some it's a joyous object, it makes you smile, it makes you laugh because it's satirical."

The balloon-like object has recently arrived at it’s new home, "squashed" in a suitcase.

"The most ironic and fitting thing now is it's currently in quarantine in the museum," Ms Ament said.

"All objects have to be put into quarantine before they go into the collection because they could have insects or with something like clothing... moths."

The Museum’s conservation team will be working to preserve the objects for audiences with future generations.  

"This is seven metres tall, there is nothing like it in our collections at all. It's a massive challenge," she said.

The Museum is a fitting home as the effigy is "a response from Londoners," she said.

"It was born in London ... It was an extraordinary and imaginative idea."

And she added: "It is timely because it's coming to us in the final days of President Trump being President Trump."

The makers of the blimp said: "This large inflatable was just a tiny part of a global movement – a movement that was led by the marginalised people whose Trump's politics most endangered – and whose role in this moment should never be underestimated."

Joe Biden's inauguration takes place on January 20.

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