‘Smart poster’ allowing contactless payments to homeless people trialled on high street

Each tap donates £3 to local charity providing shelter and food

Richard Jenkins
Thursday 30 January 2020 19:19
Comments
Paypoint is located on the high street in Bath, Somerset
Paypoint is located on the high street in Bath, Somerset

A "smart window poster" which allows contactless donations to be made to the homeless has been installed for the first time on a British high street.

Technology that allows donations to be made via contactless payment is being trialled at Nationwide’s Union Street branch in Bath, Somerset.

Each simple tap donates £3 to a local charity which provides shelter and food to homeless people in the area, with users being able to tap multiple times per visit. The trial raised £400 in the first week.

It is hoped the initiative will make it easier for people to donate money, in addition to instilling confidence in those who feel uncomfortable giving cash directly to homeless people.

The Good Start Tap to Donate scheme, which is managed by local homeless charity Julian House, was developed with Nationwide Building Society and Bath Business Improvement District.

All money raised will go towards the Julian House Good Start fund, which will help improve and eradicate homelessness in Bath and North East Somerset.

Nationwide branch manager Stephanie Pritchard said: “At a time when many people don’t have spare change or may not wish to hand it directly to someone who is homeless, having a contactless point in the window of the branch has bridged the gap.

“As a branch we are very much here for the community.

“This novel way of raising money for a fantastic cause is a great example of how technology is playing a role in helping society, one tap at a time.”

As a payment method, contactless usage continues to rapidly rise.

During 2018 the number of contactless payments made in the UK increased by 31 per cent, to 7.4 billion payments, according to a UK Finance report.

Other charities and not-for-profit organisations, including The Big Issue, have also recently turned to contactless payments as a way of securing revenue.

Roanne Wootten, operations director for Julian House, said: “Tapping could fund welcome packs, which include toiletries and sanitary products in crisis accommodation, new bedding and essentials when moving into supported housing, a birth certificate, a passport or a driving licence.

“Fundamentally it is about the person and what they need to help them to come off the streets – it will be different for everyone.”

SWNS

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in