Can you help Scotland Yard solve the seven-year mystery of the severed finger?

Detectives admit they have no idea who the finger belonged to and how it came to be detached.  

Adam Lusher
Thursday 06 July 2017 11:41
Comments
After seven years, Scotland Yard detectives remain baffled as to who the finger belonged to and how it was parted from its owner
After seven years, Scotland Yard detectives remain baffled as to who the finger belonged to and how it was parted from its owner

Police are appealing for information to help solve the mystery of a severed human finger found in a disused shop nearly seven years ago.

Detectives have remained baffled as to whose finger it was ever since a dog discovered it in the back yard of the empty shop in Woburn Walk near London’s Euston Station on December 4 2010.

Despite an extensive police search, no other human remains were found in the vicinity.

At one point, detectives thought the finger might have been blown off a victim of the July 7 2005 attacks, because of its proximity to where suicide bomber Hasib Hussain detonated his device on a double decker bus heading down Upper Woburn Place towards Tavistock Square.

But after DNA from the finger was compared to all victims and survivors, Scotland Yard investigators concluded it was not linked to the 7/7 attacks.

The DNA analysis confirmed it was a human finger, from a male, but there were no matches with any missing persons or crime reports from the time.

The DNA has since been loaded onto the national missing person database, but officers are still no closer to making a match or knowing the circumstances of how the finger became parted from its owner.

Detectives are now appealing for the public to share any information they may have to help solve the seven-year mystery.

DC Tom Boon, from the Central North Command's Missing Persons Unit, said: “It is quite the mystery.

“We have now exhausted all lines of inquiry and have been unable to find out who the finger belongs to and how the finger became detached in the first place.

“We are now appealing for the public to help us solve the case. If anyone has any information, no matter how small or insignificant they think it is, we would urge them to contact us. It would be great to be able to find out who the finger belongs to after all these years.”

Anyone with information should contact the Central North Command's Missing Persons Unit on 07881 330963 or 020 8733 6543, or police via 101 or Twitter @MetCC.

Information can also be reported anonymously to Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111 or online at www.crimestoppers-uk.org.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in