EU referendum: Boris Johnson's Vote Leave campaign accused of launching 'xenophobic attack' video

'This is a xenophobic attack from a leave campaign that knows it is losing the debate'

Oliver Wright
Political Editor
Friday 20 May 2016 17:11
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Vote Leave campaign advert questions Cameron's stance on Turkey

Brexit campaigners have being accused of launching a vicious xenophobic attack video that comes from the “propaganda playbooks of 100 years ago”.

The video, released today, suggests David Cameron is lying to voters about his support for Turkish membership of the EU which Brexit campaigners say would cripple the NHS.

But the video is also interspersed with images of Turkish MPs brawling in the country’s Parliament – which critics claim amounts to a “xenophobic attack from a leave campaign that knows it is losing the debate”.

The video shows Mr Cameron telling MPs: “If your vote in this referendum is being influenced by consideration of Turkey’s membership of the EU – don’t think about it. It’s not remotely on the cards.”

It then contrasts this with an undated clip of Mr Cameron in Downing Street saying: “This is something I feel very strongly about. Together I want to pave the road from Ankara to Brussels.”

The video ends saying that “you can’t trust David Cameron on Turkey”. If you want to save the NHS vote leave”.

Meral Hussein-Ece, Liberal Democrat Equalities Spokesperson, said the video represented “more desperation from Brexit and Project Fear”.

“This is a xenophobic attack from a leave campaign that knows it is losing the debate. Stigmatising Turkey and the people who live there is a dangerous move which comes from the propaganda playbooks of 100 years ago.

“One of the great things about the EU is that it encourages us to work together; instead the leave campaign are offering a world of division and distrust. This is not a future we should be fighting for.”

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