Theresa May appoints David Cameron's former policy chief as NHS minister in Lords reshuffle

Lord O'Shaughnessy is one of several Tories ennobled by David Cameron to get Government jobs

Jon Stone
Political Correspondent
Wednesday 21 December 2016 13:33
Comments
There were a number of changes to the Government Lords front bench
There were a number of changes to the Government Lords front bench

Theresa May has appointed David Cameron’s former Downing Street policy chief as a minister at the Department of Health.

Lord O'Shaughnessy, who advised the former Prime Minister from 2010 to 2011, will replace Lord Brampton as a minister for NHS Productivity.

After working for Mr Cameron, the new minister went on to work for Portland Communications as chief policy advisor.

He has been a vocal supporter of Michael Gove’s free market reforms to the schools system and also works for the Legatum Institute, a think tank that promotes international capitalism.

The promotion is part of a small reshuffle in the Government’s House of Lords front bench, which will also see Baroness Neville-Rolfe move from the business department to the Treasury, where she will be Commercial Secretary.

The changes see top Tories ennobled by David Cameron, including in his controversial resignation honours, promoted to the Government benches.

Baroness Vere, a former Tory candidate who failed to get elected in 2010 and who is a former director of the failed pro-EU Conservatives In campaign, will become a whip, as will Baroness Buscombe.

Lord Brampton himself will move to the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

Lord Henley will take an additional role at the Department for Work and Pensions, replacing Lord Freud, the architect of Universal Credit who announced his retirement earlier this month.

Baroness Shields’ role in internet safety and security has become the sole responsibility of the Home Office, having previously been shared with the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Additional reporting by PA

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