Piers Gaveston Society: Founder of elite Oxford University club ridicules allegations David Cameron put his genitals in a dead pig

One of the group's founders says David Cameron was never a member of the group and therefore there was no need for an initiation ceremony

Matt Dathan
Monday 21 September 2015 13:17
Comments
David Cameron has been accused of 'inserting a private part of his anatomy' into a dead pig's mouth
David Cameron has been accused of 'inserting a private part of his anatomy' into a dead pig's mouth

The extraordinary allegation that David Cameron once "inserted a private part of his anatomy" into a dead pig's mouth as an initiation into an elite Oxford University drinking club has been dismissed as “purely malicious gossip” by one of the group’s founders.

The claim was made in an inflammatory new book, co-authored by Lord Ashcroft, the former deputy chairman of the Conservative party who fell out with the Prime Minister after he failed to make good on an alleged promise to give the prolific Tory donor a top job once he entered Downing Street in 2010.

But Valentine Guinness, one of the founders of the debauched group called the Piers Gaveston Society, said this morning that Mr Cameron was never a member of the group.

He told the Spectator it was “a ridiculous story,” adding: “As far as I know David Cameron was never a member of the Piers Gaveston Society, so there would have been no need for an initiation ceremony.

“He may well have attended one of their parties, but the pig’s head story is purely malicious gossip.”

Toby Young, an author, columnist and a contemporary of Mr Cameron's at Oxford University, said he had spoken to members of the Piers Gaveston Society who "weren't particularly discreet about what they and their friends had got up to" but none had mentioned the allegations made about Mr Cameron in the book.

"If anything like this had happened I think I would have heard about it," he wrote.

Downing Street refused to comment on the allegation, as well as staying silent on a raft of other claims made in the book, including accusations that he allowed cocaine into his London home, smoked cannabis with friends during his time at Oxford University and allegations that he misled the public over the non-dom status of Lord Ashcroft.

The Prime Minister's spokeswoman said: “I’m not intending to dignify this book by offering any comment or any PM reaction to it."

She added that the author "has set out his reasons for writing it,” suggesting the Prime Minister views the book as an act of revenge for his refusal to offer Lord Ashcroft a top job when he entered Downing Street in 2010.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in