Young mother 'makes most convincing argument for Jeremy Corbyn' during radio show

'I can’t see that any of the policies would actually be a bad thing because I think they really resonate with working class people,' says Daisy

Benjamin Kentish
Wednesday 17 May 2017 19:13
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Young mother who backs Corbyn 'makes most convincing argument for voting Labour'

A young mother has been credited with making “one of the most convincing arguments for voting Labour” after calling a radio phone-in show to claim that Jeremy Corbyn would help her and her family.

The caller, named Daisy, told LBC radio host Iain Dale that the policies in Labour’s manifesto would benefit working class people.

“I completely agree with pretty much every single policy that Jeremy Corbyn has put forward”, she said.

“Personally, for myself and for all of the other people that I know in the village that I live in, I can’t see that any of the policies would actually be a bad thing because I think they really resonate with working class people," she said.

Highlighting Labour’s promise to introduce a new £10-an-hour minimum wage , she said it was potentially “an absolutely huge benefit” for her and her partner.

“People need to realise that if you’re working class, you should be voting for Jeremy Corbyn”, she said.

Daisy said she believed the Labour leader could still win the election, claiming there has been “a massive surge in support for him”.

“I don’t think it’s reflected in the media how popular he can be and how popular he is” she said. “That’s a real shame because the more people that know about him and his policies, it would be a good thing.”

“It seems to be that people just want to bash Jeremy Corbyn,” she added. “That’s always a tell-tale sign: when the elite don’t want someone like him in power because I think he would actually do things for the working class rather than cutting funding.

“Everything that is a benefit to myself and my partner and all the people that I know has been cut.”

The new mother added she had been told she would not be able to access free ante-natal classes because of funding cuts and would had to “pay and go private”, which she could not afford to do.

LBC host Iain Dale told the caller: “If Jeremy Corbyn wants someone for his next party political broadcast, Daisy, I think he ought to give you a call.”

The call was "one of the most convincing arguments for voting Labour” that he had heard, he added.

Corbyn and Labour party explainer

In addition to a higher minimum wage, Labour has also pledged to ban zero hours contracts, raise income tax on high earners, introduce universal childcare for 2-4 year olds and scrap tuition fees.

Launching his party’s manifesto in Bradford, Mr Corbyn said: “Our country will only work for the many not the few if opportunity is in the hands of the many. So our manifesto is a plan for everyone to have a fair chance to get on in life, because our country will only succeed when everyone succeeds.”

The Conservatives, however, described Labour’s plans as “nonsensical”.

David Gauke, the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, said: “Jeremy Corbyn’s nonsensical ideas simply don’t add up. And every single working family in this country would pay for Corbyn’s chaos with higher taxes.

“It’s clear that proposal after proposal in this manifesto will mean more borrowing and debt: from promises on benefits, to promises on prison guards, to promises on nationalising the water network.”

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