Japanese dads jumping near their daughters

See the fathers leap exuberantly next to their progeny!

Dads are the best. Forever embarrassing their children with lame jokes and two-stepping to Dire Straights, blissfully unaware of their cringeyness.

Artist Yuki Aoyama has celebrated this in a set of photographic portraits, which see girls standing expressionless as their fathers jump and generally act like goofs beside them.

The series is called Sorariman, a play on the words sora (sky) and salary man.

The dads look wonderfully youthful and carefree, acting out like toddlers and skewing the generation difference implied by the chronology of the subjects.

Here are some of the best portraits.

Happy dad

Perched on an invisible wall dad

Exuberant dad

Pike jump dad

Plucking imaginary double bass dad

Stupendous high five dad

Broadway dad

Chill dad

Levitating dad

Pop punk dad

Thoughtful dad

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