Kentucky tornado: 100-year-old church in Mayfield destroyed within seconds

100-year-old Mayfield First United Methodist Church in Kentucky was destroyed in Friday night’s tornado

Tornado tears across nearly 200 miles in Kentucky

A 100-year-old church in Kentucky’s Mayfield was destroyed in seconds as a massive tornado struck the state on Friday night, leaving behind a trail of destruction.

“It has been one of the toughest nights in Kentucky history,” said Kentucky governor Andy Beshear on Saturday.

The governor added that “more than 80” people had been killed in the path of a tornado stretching at least 200 miles.

“Some areas have been hit in ways that are hard to put into words,” he said.

Mayfield, a town of about 10,000 people, has been the hardest hit in Friday’s tornado.

Most of the town’s larger building structures have been destroyed completely, including the town’s 100-year-old church.

Mayfield First United Methodist Church, which has been in the town since 1920, has been completely devastated.

Upon entering the church, a heap of debris, that was once the church’s stairwell, remained stacked on one side, reported the BBC.

In the main church area, only a few pew benches have survived. The roof of the cavernous church collapsed onto the pew, leaving behind an entangled mess of beams and bricks.

One wall of the church too appears to have given in.

With the church’s roof ripped off completely, the building stood vulnerable to collapsing.

Reverend Joey Reed, lead pastor at the church, said to the Los Angeles Times that with the roof gone, he could no longer worship at his church.

He said that when he saw the rubble remains of the church on Friday, he wondered how on earth could he deliver his scheduled sermon on joy.

“We have been struck, but we are not destroyed,” Mr Reed said to a small congregation on Sunday.

“We are blessed beyond any curse.”

“Our church is totally gone,” said a resident to the New York Times. “Nothing was salvageable except for the communion table.”

While the church was founded in 1833 and began in the homes and barns of its members, according to the church website.

In 1856, the congregation built a larger structure with stained glass, and it became the only building in Mayfield to be used solely for worship.

The present building was designed in 1915 and was completed in 1920.

“What I’ve already told our church is we teach and preach it and now we have to live it — the campus and facility is not the church. It’s the people,” said Wes Fowler, pastor of the church to Kentucky.com.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in