Resident of Surfside sister building shares photos of crack in his block as people given option to evacuate

Engineer hired to look at East and North towers says ‘no visible evidence of of any major structural concern’, despite emergence of hole

<p>A resident of a sister building to Champlain Towers South points to a crack in his block</p>

A resident of a sister building to Champlain Towers South points to a crack in his block

Leer en Español

A resident of Champlain Towers East has said he was concerned by a crack that appeared following the collapse of Champlain Towers South in Surfside, Florida.

Robert Lisman, a resident of the sister building to Champlain Towers South, told NBC Miami the crack was caused by “concussion” from the collapse of the beachfront condo on Friday.

Officials have so far confirmed 11 fatalities and a further 150 people remain unaccounted for in the wreckage of the condo, which was constructed in 1981 on the beachfront.

Mr Lisman, who lives in a sister building that was built 13 years after Champlain Towers South, told NBC Miami that he had concerns but believed there was “no imminent threat” of collapse.

“I have concerns but I am not panicking,” Mr Lisman said. “I know there are things we need to address and look at, but there is no imminent threat. I’m confident in my building, Champlain Towers East.”

It comes as officials survey both the Champlain Towers East and North, another sister building constructed a year after Champlain Towers South. Residents of both blocks have been offered with evacuation.

Allyn Kilsheimer, a structural engineer, was hired by the city of Surfside to look at the East and North towers. He confirmed that there was “no visible evidence of of any major structural concern”.

A more detailed inspection will also be carried out.

So far, structural engineers who have examined surveillance video of the collapse have suggested that a “weakness” at the foundation of Champlain Towers South, could have caused the building to fold under its weight.

It follows revelations about a 2018 assessment of the condo, which warned of “major structural damage” and repairs costing $12 million, which were due to begin in the days after the collapse.

It was alleged that an additional 13th floor to the 1981 building, adding 9 feet, was approved by officials despite breaking rules for height. According to the Wall Street Journal , it is not clear if the addition contributed to Friday’s tragedy.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in