Norway plane crash: Four US soldiers onboard military aircraft killed during Nato training exercise

PM Jonas Gahr Store expresses ‘deepest sympathies’ to families and colleagues

Sam Hancock
Saturday 19 March 2022 09:30
Comments
<p>This file photo from 2014 shows a US Marine Corps Osprey aircraft, similar to the one that crashed</p>

This file photo from 2014 shows a US Marine Corps Osprey aircraft, similar to the one that crashed

All four US soldiers who were onboard a military plane that crashed in Norway on Friday have died, according to the country’s prime minister.

Jonas Gahr Store expressed his “deepest sympathies” to the families of those who were killed, writing in a tweet: “It is with great sadness we have received the message that four American soldiers died in a plane crash last night ... Our deepest sympathies go to the soldiers’ families, relatives and fellow soldiers in their unit.”

Rescue services reached the crash site by land early on Saturday after helicopters were unable to help due to poor weather conditions.

Local forecasts at the time suggested there were gale-force winds, heavy rain and the risk of avalanches.

The V-22B Osprey aircraft, which belonged to the US Marine Corps, “had a crew of four and was out on a training mission in Nordland County,” Norway’s armed forces said in a statement.

It was on its way north to Bodo, where it was scheduled to land just before 6pm on Friday, the statement added. However, a search operation was launched after the aircraft was reported missing when it failed to arrive.

Local volunteers and the Red Cross assisted with the rescue.

The annual drill – called Cold Response – is designed to prepare Nato member countries for the defence of Norway. It is unrelated to the war in Ukraine, officials stressed.

No cause was given for the crash, but the Norwegian armed forces said that Cold Response, which is due to run until 1 April, “will carry on as planned, with the measures we have to take due to the weather.”

An investigation has now been launched into the crash but bad weather is said to be making it difficult for officials to make a dent in their proceedings.

Reports of the crash surfaced late on Friday, with the Norwegian military saying the plane crashed due to bad weather in a “rugged area”.

US military Ospreys, whose tilting rotors can either point upward like a helicopter or forward like an airplane, have been involved in multiple crashes over the years.

In 2017, three US Marines were killed when a V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft crashed off the coast of Australia. And back in April 2000, a V-22 Marine tilt-rotor Osprey crashed during a night landing in Arizona, killing 19.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in