Obama says Biden has 'good instincts' despite Iraq War vote

Former president says Democratic nominee has “good instincts” and learned lessons in past 

Gino Spocchia
Thursday 15 October 2020 16:42
Comments
Obama says ousting Trump is about ‘whether or not our democracy endures’
Leer en Español

Former president Barack Obama praised Joe Biden’s “good instincts” and said he would use them as president, despite voting for the Iraq war.

In an appearance on the “Pod Save America” podcast, Mr Obama discussed how a Biden administration would be able to implement “actual policy that works”, and that lived-up to his “good instincts”, having learned lessons from almost five decades in politics.

On the Iraq war, the Democrat argued that Mr Biden “learned a lesson from that”, having later admitted that his vote for the Iraq War as a senator "was a mistake".

“As you know, he was probably the person who was most restrained in terms of use of military force among my senior advisers during the course of my presidency,” Mr Obama told the podcast, which became available on Wednesday, of his vice president.

“He consistently believed that we should show restraint and humility and think through the use of military power and had huge confidence and faith in the use of diplomacy as a strategy for showing American leadership. And that instinct I think is going to trickle out,”

Describing the presidential nominee’s so-called “North Star”, Mr Obama predicted that “at the same time, you’ll have a lot of people around him who were able to translate his good instincts into actual policy that works,”

“He understands the importance of surrounding himself with people who are smart and are, you know, believe in science and believe in expertise and believe in, you know, institutional knowledge and experience,” said the Democrat.

Mr Obama, who endorsed Mr Biden as the 2020 Democratic presidential nominee in April, is due to make more campaign appearances as the 3 November election nears.

Speaking to MSNBC last month, the Democratic presidential nominee said he backed then-president George W. Bush over claims Iraq had weapons of mass destruction, and had voted because he wanted to "prevent a war from happening."

"The threat was to go to war," he told “The Last Word”. "The argument was because Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction, so he said that 'I need to be able to get the security council to agree to send in inspectors to put pressure on Saddam to find out whether he's producing nuclear weapons.' ”

Mr Biden’s Republican opponent, Donald Trump, has previously taunted the former vice president over his support for the war, and claimed that US military leaders “want to do noth­ing but fight wars”.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in