Even Fox News analysts say Trump should face criminal charges as channel starts airing Jan 6 hearings

One analyst says Trump may have crossed a ‘legal line’ by making ‘false statements in conjunction with the certification of an election’

Shweta Sharma
Wednesday 22 June 2022 20:22
Comments

‘The lie hasn’t gone away’: Jan 6 committee chairman says Trump threat to elections is ongoing

Leer en Español

Fox News analysts have said evidence from the January 6 House select committee showed Donald Trump’s “unfitness” to lead the country and that he may be guilty of a crime.

Analysing the fourth hearing by the panel investigating the Capitol insurrection, former assistant US attorney Andy McCarthy was asked by Fox News host Anita Vogel if the panel was trying to charge the former president with “conspiracy to defraud the United States”.

“No, I don’t think so, I think the most plausible crime is obstruction of Congress,” Mr McCarthy replied.

He said the committee was “relying heavily on the opinion of a federal district judge in California, David Carter, a Clinton appointee who once ran for public office as a Democrat, a lot of bombastic rhetoric in that opinion, not surprising they are relying on it.

He argued: “What I would just say is that if you had a different perspective being presented here, I don’t think that would be very helpful to President Trump, per se, because the evidence pretty clearly shows his unfitness.”

“It even suggests that he may be guilty of a crime, maybe, maybe not, there are arguments on both sides, but I would highlight here is the plausible gap, a scheme that attacked every tier of government versus how likely it was to succeed,” he added.

It came as Fox News walked back on its previous plans of not airing the primetime hearings which made it the only major American outlet to not air the hearings for a short while.

The conservative channel did not air the first hearing live, but joined other networks for the subsequent ones.

Fox News host Neil Cavuto also remarked on the revelations from the hearings, saying they made Mr Trump “look awful. Just awful”.

“If you knowingly make statements you know aren’t true and they’re proven untrue and yet you still make the statements – maybe because you’re totally and personally convinced you’re on the right and they’re on the wrong – at what point does that cross a constitutional line and maybe a legal one?” he asked legal expert Thomas Dupree on the discussion panel.

“Tom, you’re a lawyer and a great one,” Cavuto began. “And I’m not, but this just seems to make Donald Trump look awful. Just awful.”

Mr Dupree, who earlier served in the Justice Department under George W Bush, said Mr Trump could be in legal trouble and that he can cross a “legal line if you’re making those false statements in conjunction with the certification of an election or you’re trying to corrupt the count or things of that nature”.

Tuesday’s hearing focused on Mr Trump and his legal team’s efforts to pressure lawmakers and state officials in Georgia and Arizona to halt the certification of Joe Biden’s victory and appoint Trump-voting electors to flip their respective states’s electoral college votes in his favour.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in