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Trump news – live: Trump lawyer says FBI agents’ identities should be made public despite violent threats

Media organisations are asking judge to unseal document that underpinned warrant for search at ex-president’s residence

Trump’s lawyer says FBI agents identities should be made public after Mar-a-Lago raid

One of the attorneys representing Donald Trump in the wake of the FBI raid on Mar-a-Lago has said that CCTV from the search should be released and the agents who carried it out identified – this despite a surge in violent threats against law enforcement agents and justice officials from outraged Trump supporters.

Judge Bruce Reinhart, who signed the search warrant for the raid, says he is inclined to partially release the document as media organisations have requested. He will make a final decision next week after the redactions have been made.

The Justice Department has rebuffed demands to release the affidavit, warning that it could “chill” future efforts to secure witness cooperation, and argued that the investigation is still in its early days. Mr Trump has said he wants the affidavit to be released, but his legal team have taken no official steps to make it public.

This comes a January 6 Committee Vice Chair Liz Cheney has said that the panel are “in discussions” with the counsel for former Vice President Mike Pence.

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Court opens door to voiding North Carolina Voter ID amendment

North Carolina’s highest court opened the door Friday to nullifying a voter ID mandate approved by citizens in 2018 because the lawmakers who put it on the ballot were elected from districts tainted by illegal racial bias.

However, the North Carolina Supreme Court stopped short of striking down the voter ID requirement and another constitutional amendment that limited income tax rates, ruling that a lower court must gather more evidence on the measures before tossing them out.

Voter identification is not currently required in North Carolina, because it’s held up in separate litigation regarding state voter laws. Friday’s ruling doesn’t alter that situation.

The long-awaited ruling, decided 4-3 by the court’s Democratic majority, is a victory for the state NAACP, which sued Republican legislative leaders. It undoes a state appeals court ruling that upheld the amendments, and it sends the case back to Wake County Judge G. Bryan Collins, Jr., who previously struck down the amendments pending an evidentiary hearing that can now be held.

Friday’s ruling decried that the Republican-controlled legislature proceeded with the process of putting the constitutional amendments on the ballot despite the fact that more than two dozen districts had been found to be tainted by illegal racial bias.

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VIDEO: Ex-WWE CEO Vince McMahon transferred $5 million to Trump foundation in 2007 and 2009

Former WWE CEO Vince McMahon paid $5 million to Donald Trump's foundation in 2007 and 2009
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Mitch McConnell suggests GOP ‘candidate quality’ could blow party’s chances of winning Senate

Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell offered a grim forecast for his party’s chances to flip control of the upper chamber, pointing to “candidate quality” as a key factor in critical races that could determine the balance of power in Congress.

He suggested that the GOP is more likely to win a majority in the House of Representatives rather than the Senate with midterm elections this fall, an election cycle that historically boosts the minority party but has sagged several Republican candidates in tight Senate races in a handful of states.

“I think there’s probably a greater likelihood the House flips than the Senate,” Mr McConnell said during remarks in Kentucky on 18 August, according to NBC News. “Senate races are just different, they’re statewide, candidate quality has a lot to do with the outcome.”

Mitch McConnell suggests GOP ‘candidate quality’ could blow party’s chances of winning Senate

Earlier this week, a political action committee tied to Mr McConnell flooded the campaign for Donald Trump-endorsed Ohio Republican Senate candidate JD Vance, boosted by $28m in radio and television adverts ahead of a general election against Democratic candidate and current US Rep Tim Ryan.

In response to the GOP’s spending, Congressman Ryan said on Twitter that “if they’re so focused on our race, that means we must be doing something right. Here’s my message for Mitch McConnell, JD Vance, and the rest of the GOP: Bring it on.”

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Who is Sam Harris and why did his Trump comments cause such a stir?

American writer, scientist and philosopher Sam Harris has become the right-wing media‘s public enemy number one — at least for a day — after essentially claiming a media and government coverup to keep Donald Trump out of office would be justifiable.

Right-wing media commentators have seized upon this statement, treating Mr Harris as the embodiment of liberal thought and, by extension, suggesting all liberals support media coverups, cheating and skullduggery, so long as it keeps Mr Trump out of office.

Who is Sam Harris?

Mr Harris is perhaps best known for his writings on faith and religion, but he has delved into other topics, all of which seem to centre on understanding morality and ethics from both a philosophical and physiological perspective.

He is not just a prolific thinker and writer; he’s also an outspoken commentator who says things that make lots of people angry and which get him a lot of attention. He initially employed this tactic by enraging Christians online, and continued it when he shifted his focus to Muslims. In 2017, he featured race “scientist” Charles Murray on his podcast. Mr Murray is the author of The Bell Curve, a book that attempts to link race and intelligence and intelligence to one’s genetics, and which has appealed to some white supremacists. His appearance on Mr Harris’s podcast was met with a mix of revulsion on the left and nodding approval on the right.

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Judge rejects Lindsey Graham’s last-ditch bid to avoid testifying in Georgia election probe

For the second time in a week, a federal judge in Georgia has ordered South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham to give evidence before the Fulton County grand jury investigating former president Donald Trump’s attempts to overturn the 2020 election in the Peach State.

Earlier this week US District Judge Leigh Martin May rejected Mr Graham’s motion to quash a subpoena ordering him to give evidence before the special grand jury, which is operating under the supervision of Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis.

According to a copy of the subpoena viewed by The Independent, the Georgia judge who signed off on the document found that Mr Graham “questioned Secretary Raffensperger and his staff about reexamining certain absentee ballots cast in Georgia in order to explore the possibility of a more favourable outcome” for the then-president, who in November 2020 became the first Republican to lose the Peach State’s electoral votes since Bill Clinton defeated then-president George HW Bush in 1992.

The South Carolina Republican had claimed immunity from having to testify before the grand jury because he is a “high-ranking government official”, and because the US Constitution’s “speech or debate” clause prohibits the court from requiring him to appear. But Judge May rejected both of those claims, writing that “there are considerable areas of potential grand jury inquiry” which would not be covered by the “speech or debate” clause, which only shields senators official acts from scrutiny.

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New York Democratic candidate sparks debate claiming politicians past child-bearing age shouldn’t have say on abortion

A New York Democratic state senator running in the US congressional primary next week is digging in her heels after a controversial tweet saying lawmakers “past child-bearing age” are not well positioned to fight for abortion rights and should make way for younger legislators.

On 5 July, state Senator Alessandra Biaggi, 36, fired off the tweet that, at the time, gained little notice.

“At the risk of sounding ageist, it’s still important to ask: when a majority of Congress is past child-bearing age, how fierce can we expect their fight to be?” tweeted the Democratic challenger to Rep Sean Patrick Maloney, who has represented New York’s 18th Congressional District since 2013, but is running in the 17th Congressional District this year against Ms Biaggi.

The story might end there, except for the fact that, with only a few days to go to the tight New York congressional primary race, a pro-Maloney group breathed new life into the controversy-stirring remark by plastering the quote onto campaign materials dispersed this week.

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Cheney speaks out on possible presidential run and if Trump will be asked to speak to Jan 6 committee

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VIDEO: Trump raised as much as $1 million a day after Mar-a-Lago raid

Trump raised up to $1 million a day in donations after FBI's Mar-a-Lago raid
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Alec Baldwin says he feared for his life following Trump’s Rust shooting comments

Alec Baldwin has said that after former US President Donald Trump’s Rust shooting comments, he was “100 per cent nervous” about being attacked by Trump supporters.

The 64-year-old actor fatally shot cinematographer Halyna Hutchins and wounded director Joel Souza on the set of Rust on October 21, after assistant director David Halls allegedly handed him a prop gun which turned out to be loaded.

A few weeks after the incident, Trump baselessly suggested Baldwin may have deliberately shot his two colleagues.

On a recent CNN appearance (via TMZ), the 30 Rock actor admitted that he was “worried” about what Trump supporters might have done to him following the former president’s comments.

Alec Baldwin feared for his life after Trump said he intentionally shot woman on film set

“The former president of the United States said [I] probably shot her on purpose. To me, that was the only time I was worried about what was going to happen,” Baldwin said. “Here was Trump, who instructed people to commit acts of violence, and he was pointing the finger at me and saying I was responsible for the death.”

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Georgia can ban people handing out food and water to voters, federal judge rules

A federal judge has upheld Georgia’s ban on people handing out food and water to voters waiting in line to cast their ballots at the polls, part of a sweeping election law that has faced widespread criticism and a series of legal challenges.

US District Judge JP Boulee denied a request for a preliminary injunction from a coalition of voting rights groups who challenged the recently enacted ban on so-called “line relief” measures that makes it a crime to give out food or water within 150 feet of a polling place or within 25 feet of a person standing in line to vote.

Opponents argue that the measure is an attempt to suppress votes in areas where voters are more likely to endure longer lines on Election Day.

The judge argued that the law does not prohibit groups from verbally encouraging voters to stay in line or helping elderly or disabled voters.

But Judge Boulee suggested that banning food and drink within 25 feet of any voter standing in lines is likely unconstitutional, given reports of hours-long lines that have formed in some precincts disproportionately impacting Black voters.

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