Japanese crown prince ‘approves’ daughter’s wedding to non-royal despite money issues

‘If that is what they really want, then I think that is something I need to respect as a parent,’ said Crown Prince Fumihito

Namita Singh
Monday 30 November 2020 12:42
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<p>Japan’s Crown Prince Akishino (behind C) with his wife Crown Princess Kiko (behind R) and their children.</p>

Japan’s Crown Prince Akishino (behind C) with his wife Crown Princess Kiko (behind R) and their children.

Japan's Crown Prince Fumihito, the younger brother of Emperor Naruhito said he "approves" of his daughter's marriage to her university boyfriend but added that his mother must resolve the outstanding money issue she is involved in.  

Princess Mako was set to marry her fiance Kei Komuro in 2018 but was the big day was postponed to this year due to a row reportedly centred on money that Mr Komuro’s mother borrowed from her ex-fiance to cover her son’s tuition fees and allegedly never paid back.

 “I mean, I approve of them getting married. The Constitution says marriage shall be based only on the mutual consent of both sexes. If that is what they really want, then I think that is something I need to respect as a parent,” the crown prince was quoted by the Japanese news agency, Kyodo.  

The crown prince added: "In order for many people to be convinced and celebrate (the marriage), I have said it is important for the issue to be dealt with.”  

"From my point of view, I think they are not in a situation where many people are convinced and pleased (about their marriage)," he said.

Mr Komuro, who is studying at New York’s Fordham University, said last year that the issue of an unpaid loan to his mother's former fiance had been settled. But the former fiance disputed this. 

Princess Mako, Emperor Akihito’s oldest grandchild, will lose her title when she marries Mr Komuro a commoner. The couple, both 29, met at Tokyo’s International Christian University in 2012 and excitement swept the country when they announced their engagement in 2017.

The palace had requested 150 million yen (£984,000) as part of its 2018 budget to cover the costs of Mako leaving the royal family.

Under the imperial household law, female members lose their royal status when they marry a commoner.

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