Australians will soon have to pay $40 for a packet of cigarettes

Stringent anti-smoking laws in the country have already seen the smoking population plummet to less than 15 per cent in six years

May Bulman
Thursday 15 September 2016 10:27
Comments
Australia already have some of the most stringent anti-smoking laws in the world, which has seen the country’s smoking population plummet to less than 15 per cent in the past six years
Australia already have some of the most stringent anti-smoking laws in the world, which has seen the country’s smoking population plummet to less than 15 per cent in the past six years

It is already among the most expensive places in the world to buy cigarettes, but the cost of tobacco in Australia is about to rise even more.

A packet of cigarettes in the country will cost $40 (£23) by 2020, after new legislation was cleared in the Australian parliament yesterday (14 September).

The levy on cigarettes will rise by 12.5 per cent over four years, increasing the price by more than 50 per cent and raising an estimated $4.7billion (£3.5billion) in the process.

The price of 25 cigarettes in the country currently stands at the equivalent of between £13-15, compared with an average pack of 20 costing around £8 in the UK.

Australian treasurer Scott Morrison first announced the tobacco tax hike in May during his 2016 budget address, in a move that was billed as a health measure by ministers rather than a financial one.

The 2016 budget papers stated: “One of the most effective ways to discourage smoking is to increase the price of cigarettes.

“Increases in tobacco excise over the last two decades have contributed to significant declines in the number of people smoking daily.”

Australia already has some of the most stringent anti-smoking laws in the world, including the 2011 Tobacco Plain Packaging Act, which requires that packets are not allowed to carry logos and must be plain aside from health warnings.

Previous tax increases in 2010 and 2013 have seen cigarette prices in Australia double over the past six years and the country’s smoking population plummet to less than 15 per cent.

A health survey of the Australian population conducted in 2013 estimated that 3.1 million Australians were smokers, amounting to around 13 per cent of the population, with 90 per cent of these people smoking daily.

Earlier this year the Australian government allocated $7.7 million in additional funding to combat the sale of illicit tobacco in the country.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in