French practice of glue traps for songbirds ruled illegal

Before the method was banned, hunters in France were given a quota of how many birds can be killed using glue traps, which was 42,000 in 2019

Ella Glover
Wednesday 17 March 2021 12:15 GMT
Comments
The practice of glue-trapping was suspended in France last August until the end of the year.
The practice of glue-trapping was suspended in France last August until the end of the year. (DPA/AFP via Getty Images)

The glue-trapping of songbirds, traditionally used in France, has been banned by the court of Justice of the European Union.

On Wednesday, the court said that, even if it is traditional, France may not authorise the glue-trapping of songbirds when more humane methods can be used. 

The court argued that birds caught using this method can sustain irreparable harm, even if cleaned. 

In a statement, the court said: “A member state may not authorise a method of capture of birds leading to by-catch where that by-catch is likely to cause harm other than negligible harm to the species concerned.

“The fact that a method of capture of birds, such as the method of hunting using limes, is traditional is not, in itself, sufficient to establish that another satisfactory solution cannot be used instead.” 

The practice of glue trapping was suspended in France last August until the end of the year. 

Read more:

I’m A Celebrity ‘illegally’ brought species to Wales

The suspension came after the European Commission gave France three months to consider its position on glue trapping, or risk a case being brought before the European Court of Justice.

Before the method was banned, hunters in France were given a quota of how many birds can be killed using glue traps, which was 42,000 in 2019. 

France is the last country to use the hunting method, which the European Commission said does not comply with the 2009 Birds Directive aimed at protecting the more than 500 wild bird species found in the EU.

Additional reporting by Reuters

Join our commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in