Series of car bombings kills 33 in Baghdad

Five car bombs exploded on Thursday morning in the latest spate of attacks

Heather Saul
Thursday 15 August 2013 13:02
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People gather at the site of a car bomb attack in Baghdad, 15 August, 2013. Five car bombs in Baghdad killed at least 23 people on Thursday and wounded more than 80, Iraqi police sources said.
People gather at the site of a car bomb attack in Baghdad, 15 August, 2013. Five car bombs in Baghdad killed at least 23 people on Thursday and wounded more than 80, Iraqi police sources said.

Iraqi officials say a wave of car bombs in Baghdad has killed 33 people and wounded dozens after two more attacks occurred today.

The figure had been 26 this morning following a spate of five car bombs.

Police officials say five car bombs exploded on Thursday morning across the city. One bomb struck near a bus station in the Khazimiyah neighborhood, killing six people and wounding 18 there.

One bomb reportedly exploded just 200-300 metres away from the fortified Green Zone diplomatic complex close to Iraq's Foreign Ministry, according to police forces.

Police say four other car bombings killed 17 people in different areas of Baghdad.

In western Baghdad, a sticky bomb attached to a cart selling gas cylinders killed three people and wounded eight others.

Medical officials speaking on condition of anonymity in a nearby hospital confirmed the casualty figures.

Mohammed Sabri, a retired government employee, was on his way to the market in Husseiniyah when he heard a thunderous explosion.

“I got closer and saw burning cars, two charred bodies and several people on the ground,” he said. “Security officials keep telling us that their forces are able to protect us, but this has not happened yet.”

Violence has been on the rise in Iraq after an April security crackdown on a Sunni protest camp in Hawijah in April. More than 3,000 people have been killed in violence during the past few months and car bombs have been detonated on a regular basis.

Additional reporting by Associated Press

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