Tyson Fury insists weight ‘doesn’t matter’ for Deontay Wilder fight

Fury’s trainer SugarHill Steward has suggested the WBC world champion could gain as much as 20 lbs since the initial rematch with Wilder last year

Jack Rathborn
Friday 08 October 2021 10:39
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<p>WBC champion Fury and challenger Wilder clash for a third time this weekend</p>

WBC champion Fury and challenger Wilder clash for a third time this weekend

Tyson Fury maintains that weight “doesn’t matter” ahead of the world title fight against Deontay Wilder.

There has been speculation about the WBC world champion’s weight after he tipped the scales at 273 lbs last February.

Fury succeeded in gaining 16.5 lbs from the first fight with the expectation that he would not change much for the third bout.

However, trainer SugarHill Steward hinted that Fury could gain as much as 20 lbs for Saturday’s fight.

“It’s not going to be 300 pounds, it’s probably going to be like 290 or something but not 300 exactly,” Steward told Vegas Insider.

“Heavier than last time by 20 pounds or so, why not? The bigger the better, the heavier the stronger.

“He’s training with that weight, he’s built up. It’s not like he’s just putting on fat, it’s building up muscles. The bigger the better, the heavier the stronger.”

But Fury has now touched on his weight and how the weigh-in will not have a significant impact on the fight.

Fury’s victory over Wilder in February 2020 saw him claim the WBC and Ring magazine belts

“It doesn’t matter - weight, size, anything like that to beat anybody,” Fury told Sky Sports.

“You can weigh 14 stone and knock a man spark out, a 25 stone man. It doesn’t really matter, the weight.

“I’m not aiming for a specific weight.

Interim WBC champion Whyte (left) is set to face the winner of Fury-Wilder

“I’m just eating plenty of food. I’ve trained hard enough and that’s it.

“Whatever I weigh in on the night, I weigh in at.”

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