David Moyes sacked: Roy Keane says Manchester United players 'should be ashamed'

Keane also defends Sir Alex Ferguson for his role in hand-picking Moyes as his successor and feels that the squad have a lot to answer to after the manager was sacked on Tuesday

Jack de Menezes
Thursday 24 April 2014 02:16
Comments

Former Manchester United captain Roy Keane has tore into the current crop of players after David Moyes was sacked by admitting “some of the players should be ashamed of themselves”.

Keane was speaking on ITV ahead of the Champions League semi-final first leg between Atletico Madrid and Chelsea – a drab 0-0 affair in the Spanish capital – and the Republic of Ireland assistant manager felt that Moyes should have been given more time to turn things around, even though he did not have the support of the players.

“He (Moyes) had a hard start,” Keane stressed. “Last summer, when he took the job, the chief executive didn't get the deals done and they had a slow start.”

United suffered a torrid time in the summer transfer window, missing out on early deals for prime targets Thiago Alcantara and Gareth Bale before failing to prise away Ander Herrera, Leighton Baines and Cesc Fabregas from their respective clubs. Even Marouane Fellaini, the one player they did sign, cost them £4m more than a release clause Moyes inserted in the midfielder’s contract during his time at Everton.

“I think it's a shame - he should have been given more time,” Keane continued. “Some of the players should be ashamed of themselves because they really let him down.”

The 42-year-old made reference to ‘The Chosen One’ nickname given to Moyes after Sir Alex Ferguson hand-picked his compatriot to succeed him at Old Trafford. It was a name that Moyes was not a fan of, and Keane feels that criticism of Ferguson for choosing Moyes is harsh given that the decision was still up to the club’s owners, the Glazer family.

“You can't be critical of Sir Alex Ferguson,” he added. “It wasn't necessarily his pick, he put his name forward but the club made the decision.

“To be seventh in the league is disappointing and you still have to take responsibility for that but he didn't have the support of the players.”

Read more: WHY GIGGS IS THE PERFECT FIT FOR THE FUTURE
THE BEST MOYES JOKES ON TWITTER
WHERE NOW FOR DAVID MOYES?

Following the match, Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho also offered his support towards Moyes, admitting that he felt “sorry” for his fellow manager just like he would for anyone that gets sacked.

“I prefer not to comment,” said Mourinho. “I feel sorry for him, obviously, but I make no comments.

“I just feel sorry for David like I feel sorry for every manager who loses his job.”

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in