Jose Mourinho: FA charge Chelsea manager with misconduct after beahviour at half-time of West Ham defeat

West Ham also charged for failing to control players

Tom Sheen
Monday 26 October 2015 18:32
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Image shows referee Jonathan Moss sending Chelsea coach Silvino Louro to the stands
Image shows referee Jonathan Moss sending Chelsea coach Silvino Louro to the stands

Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho has been charged with misconduct by the Football Association for his behaviour during the defeat at West Ham.

The Portuguese manager allegedly attempted to enter referee Jonathan Moss' dressing room at half-time at Upton Park and was banisehd from the touchline in the second half - he had to watch Chelsea lose 2-1 from the Directors' Box.

Mourinho refused to speak to the media after the defeat, instead heading straight for the exit and the team bus.

Chelsea coach Silvino Louro has also been charged with misconduct for his part in the aftermath of the Nemanja Matic sending off, he too was sent to the stands by Moss, while Chelsea and West Ham have both been charged for failing to control their players.

Mourinho is already appealing against a £50,000 fine and suspended one-match stadium ban for comments made about officials following the 3 October loss to Southampton.

A statement on the FA website read:

'Following the game between West Ham United and Chelsea on Saturday [24 October 2015], The FA has taken the following disciplinary action.

Jose Mourinho has been charged with misconduct in relation to his language and/or behaviour towards the match officials in or around the dressing room area at half-time.

Chelsea coach Silvino Louro has also been charged with misconduct in relation to his behaviour which led to his 45th minute dismissal from the technical area.

West Ham have been charged for failing to control their players in the 44th minute of the game and Chelsea have also been charged with the same offence for an alleged breach in the 45th minute of the game.

All parties have until 6pm on Thursday [29 October 2015] to reply.'

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