4 reasons why Brighton is the best student city in the UK

As young people up and down the UK debate over which city hosts the best student life, one explains why it’s Brighton

Brighton - said to be one of the UK’s liveliest and most exciting cities - has all the components for the ideal student life; there’s something for everyone. With the University of Sussex, the University of Brighton, BIMM and various other colleges around the city, you can’t walk 100 metres without spotting a student (which is pretty obvious).

It’s not just the students that make Brighton, though, the city is wonderful. It’s a city on the seafront, boasts more bars and clubs than you could ask for, has quaint coffee shops on every corner, a high street, as well as the cultured North Laines. So, let’s delve into why Brighton is the greatest student city in the UK:

1) The beach

Okay, it’s not a sand beach, but does that really matter? Whether you’re walking down the beach with a coffee, trying to cure a hangover or you’re on the beach after a night out waiting for the hangover to kick in, the sea makes everything better. It’s cathartic.

Brighton’s famous pier is also full of fun and games. You can shoot some hoops, invest in the never-ending coin machines or even go on the log flume if you’re feeling brave enough. Over the past year, the Brighton i360 has started to be erected which looks set to be the world’s tallest moving observation tower – just another reason as to why Brighton is great.

2) Nightlife

A student city would be nothing without pubs, bars and clubs – which is lucky, because Brighton has got a lot. There’s an abundance of choice: if you fancy a quiet pint, you’ll find a pub within five minutes. If you want to go out clubbing, head down to the seafront, you’ll be sure to find something from the row of clubs and bars.

From jazz to indie, pop to hip-hop, you can find pretty much any music of your choice in Brighton. One word of advice though: make sure you take a coat – those winter nights can be very chilly by the seafront.

3) Culture

Every year, thousands of people across the UK flock to Brighton for Pride. Celebrating the brilliant culture of the city is always a fun time. Every bar is open, there are street parties around every corner and everyone is enjoying themselves. What more could you ask for?

The famous Pavilion - nicknamed the Taj Mahal lookalike by many - is also pretty cool. In winter, there’s a huge ice rink and in the summer, you can pretend you’re at the actual Taj Mahal. Regardless, it’s only a £8 entry for students, so it’s a must do.

4) The North Laines

If you’ve been to Brighton, you would’ve definitely been through the North Laines. Famous to Brighton, the Laines host some of the strangest, coolest and most picturesque locations in the city. Restaurants, cafes, vintage clothing, bars, comedy clubs - you name it, it’s in the Laines. Through the back alleys, you will be able to find some of the most impressive graffiti art you’ll ever see.

Twitter: @itsOSCARb

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