The Independent’s journalism is supported by our readers. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn commission.

World’s first 3D-printed skyscraper to be built in UAE

'Through our technologies, we will be able to build architecturally complex buildings at never-before seen speeds'

Aatif Sulleyman
Tuesday 14 March 2017 15:22
Comments
Buildings have been 3D-printed before, with the key benefits being low costs and speedy completion
Buildings have been 3D-printed before, with the key benefits being low costs and speedy completion

A construction firm based in Dubai has announced plans to build the world’s first 3D-printed skyscraper.

The company, called Cazza, has confirmed that it will be erected in the United Arab Emirates.

It says it will use a new technique called “crane printing” to create the building.

“When we first thought of implementing 3D printing technologies, we were mostly thinking of houses and low-rise buildings,” Cazza CEO Chris Kelsey told Construction Week Online.

“Developers kept asking us if it was possible to build a 3D printed skyscraper. This led us to begin researching how we could adapt the technologies for taller structures.”

Buildings have been 3D-printed before, with the key benefits being low costs and speedy completion.

“Through our technologies, we will be able to build architecturally complex buildings at never-before seen speeds,” added Mr Kelsey. “It is all about economies of scale where the initial high technology costs will reduce as we enter the mass-production phase.”

Cazza is yet to disclose the building’s planned height or any commencement or completion dates, but the Encyclopedia Britannica describes a skyscraper as a building “of unusual height, generally greater than 40 or 50 stories”.

Concrete and steel will be two of the materials printed by the company’s cranes.

“The crane printing system can be easily adopted with existing cranes which means we don’t have to build cranes from scratch,” said Fernando De Los Rios, Cazza’s chief operating officer.

“We are adding new features to make it adaptable to high wind speeds along with the use of our layer smoothing system that creates completely flat surfaces. You won’t know it’s 3D printed.”

Plans for the world’s first rotating skyscraper, meanwhile, were detailed in February.

Set to be built in Dubai by 2020, it will stand at 1,375 feet tall, with each of its 80 storeys capable of rotating individually around a concrete core.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in