Holidays should be about getting into the community, not staying chained to the resort, says Justin Francis
Holidays should be about getting into the community, not staying chained to the resort, says Justin Francis

People in UK manage only 37 days at home before booking next holiday, study finds

Money, demands at home and work pressures were the main reasons given for not travelling more

Monday 02 April 2018 13:39
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The average Briton books their next holiday just 37 days after arriving home from their previous one, a survey has found.

The poll found the yearning to escape once again kicks in around 17 days arriving back in the UK. But it takes just under another three weeks before a final decision is made and a deposit is paid for the next foreign jaunt.

Of the 2,000 adults questioned, most said they enjoyed four holidays a year - going abroad once and taking three staycations in the UK, be they remaining at home or travelling to other parts of the country.

Money, demands at home and work pressures were the main reasons given for not travelling more.

One in 10 said they had gone longer than five years without a holiday, but 15 per cent said they had never gone more than six months without booking a trip away.

Almost a tenth said they felt guilty for treating themselves to a trip away when there are other things to pay for and seven per cent said deciding who to go away with stops them from booking a holiday.

Work was the main reason want to get away from when booking a holiday, while 25 per cent look forward to a break from cleaning.

A further 34 per cent said they are happiest about leaving the weather behind and one in 20 said they could not wait to be far away from their boss, while others cited a constant level of exhaustion, getting envious of other people's holiday pictures and becoming more antisocial.

One in four said they know they need a getaway when they find themselves tuning in to travel programmes on TV.

Having someone else cook, getting to eat out all the time and enjoying a cocktail with lunch were all named as some of the best parts about being on holiday.

“Experts tell us holidays and travel are important to our wellbeing," said Vinay Parmar of National Express, which conducted the survey.

“A break from the daily routine doesn’t have to involve a whole week off work or a long-haul flight. There are countless options in the UK to explore the UK and coach is a convenient and affordable way to get there.”

TOP SIGNS YOU NEED A HOLIDAY:

Feeling exhausted all the time

Starting to feel the grind of your daily routine

Getting frustrated at little or trivial things

The weather starts to get you down

Getting tired of the view from your home or workplace

Feeling moody, down and otherwise quite negative about life

Finding yourself reminiscing about past holidays

Finding yourself checking out holiday deals and watching travel programs

Feeling envious of friends' and family's holiday pics on social media

Becoming antisocial and staying in

SWNS

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