From Weinstein to Woody Allen, culture reporting has been anything but light-hearted this year

As Hollywood reckons with MeToo, journalists who work with Hollywood celebrities are also having to change how they conduct their interviews and profiles

Clémence Michallon
New York
Thursday 05 March 2020 01:56
comments
Woody Allen has been accused of molesting his daughter Dylan when she was a child. He denies the allegations
Woody Allen has been accused of molesting his daughter Dylan when she was a child. He denies the allegations

Once upon a time (in Hollyw – sorry, my brain is still recovering from awards season), culture journalism was considered one of the lighter-hearted gigs in the industry. It makes sense in a way: this is, after all, a job in which you get the chance to interview some of the world’s most popular celebrities. Movies, TV shows, music and books must be consumed in a timely manner – after all, that’s an essential part of your job.

Compared to the perils of war reporting or the adrenaline of breaking news, sure, those aspects can make the job seem comfortable, and even – gasp! – fun. But there’s been a shift in the industry. MeToo has begun reshaping Hollywood through a necessary and sometimes messy process. That means that more often than not, covering the entertainment industry is anything but light-hearted in 2020.

As an example, here’s what’s dominated most of my culture reporting over the past couple of weeks:

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

View comments