Fracking is triggering earthquakes in my hometown and has even damaged our homes. Politicians must act

Please send your letters to letters@independent.co.uk

Tuesday 27 August 2019 19:08
Comments
Campaigners win legal victory against fracking firm Ineos

Yesterday, the people of Lancashire suffered an earthquake measuring 2.9 magnitude on the Richter scale, at intensity 5, with damage caused to countless homes, including my own.

The fracking industry agreed to work to a limit of 0.5 magnitude and in this instance, Cuadrilla, the operator stopped fracking on Friday 23 August but still caused an earthquake of 2.9 magnitude some three days later (and in addition, another 1.0 magnitude last night).

Political parties should be aware that constituents and voters do not want industry induced seismicity. No amount of PR spin about “micro seismic events” will fool the thousands of Lancashire residents who described the largest earthquake like “a lorry running into their home”. Similarly, the entirely predictable fact that earthquakes would be triggered is even more irritating to those of us who have suffered.

As the organiser of an impromptu protest yesterday supported by 450 local residents, we require a complete and unilateral ban on fracking, its dangerous emissions, potential to contaminate groundwater (particularly after an earthquake can damage the well casing and allow frack fluid to migrate into the aquifer) and induced earthquakes. Politicians need to be aware that with a general election possibly on the horizon, that those MPs whose parties remain in favour of earthquakes may end up finding employment elsewhere.

Mark Mills
Little Plumpton​

Our high streets need attention

Having been to Dinan I can see what James Moore is getting at.

Living in Hebden Bridge I can see that same philosophy in action. Here we have a couple of chains; a bookies, a Tesco Metro, a Co-op and Fat Face, but predominantly small independent shops, a great market place, a lot of community businesses. But with high rents and exorbitant business rates many still struggle to make ends meet. The high street isn’t dead yet, it does need to change though. Councils, the government and business need to realise that it is no longer the centre of commerce that it once was.

Andrew Marsh
Hebden Bridge

When it comes to trains, we could learn a lot from Italy

Simon Calder highlights the idiocies of current train ticket pricing.

The UK should adopt the Italian method of pricing rail tickets by the miles travelled, with a fixed uplift for rush hour, first class etc. We should ask for tenders for rail franchises to be submitted on a “price per mile travelled” basis where the tender proposing 50p per mile beats one bidding 51p per mile. Unfortunately Italy is an EU country and the UK couldn’t possibly learn anything from the EU could it?

John Harvey
Bristol

They are not taking this seriously

Without a doubt climate change is the biggest threat facing our planet. Yet our populist, self-interested politicians place parochial short termism ahead of wider concerns: Trump withdrawing from the Paris Accord, Bolsonaro allowing rainforests to burn in order to increase Brazilian beef sales, Johnson encouraging fracking to enable UK to have its own fossil fuels.

Until we can elect politicians who are prepared to place world, strategic issues ahead of self interest then there is little hope for future generations. And the hypocrisy of Johnson, Trump, Macron and others heaping opprobrium on Bolsonaro is breathtaking.

Alistair Wood
Oswestry

The levels of child poverty in the UK are shameful

Our country must get back to a proper sense of perspective. Today BBC News reported that up to three million British children are thought to be at risk of hunger over the holidays.

The only response from government? A statement saying they have made £9m available to help. No minister involved. No reflection on how our country – one of the top ten richest in the world – could countenance such a thing. And tellingly, no response from any other opposition party.

Just a statement that says that we are giving the equivalent of just £3 per head to assist the 3 million children at threat. That’s just 8.5 pence per day, assuming a 5 week holiday.

This is not help, it’s an insult to those children and their families.

Do we the British public feel this is representative of our feelings on this matter? Or will we fall into the trap of just seeing a big number from the government spokesman “spaffed out”, and then move on?

Our people, so beloved of those who say that they represent our values are being failed by all our political classes. They should be ashamed, but in the present climate I think we all know that they won’t be.

John Sinclair
Pocklington

Why no tourist tax in Edinburgh?

We learn that Edinburgh Festival Fringe audience broke the three million barrier for the first time, with many overnight stays – yet still the SNP administration at Holyrood doesn’t allow hard-pressed Edinburgh Council to levy a much-needed tourist tax. For Nicola Sturgeon and the rest of the SNP establishment, it seems the centralisation and control of power come first, sadly the well-being of our cities somewhat distant second.

Martin Redfern
Edinburgh

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in