The hunch that is set to earn millions

Disney's latest offering, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, takes more than a few liberties with Victor Hugo's Notre Dame de Paris - 1482. Quasimodo is recast as "Quasi", an innocent 20-year-old outcast with heart, soul, vibrant voice, advised by inspirational gargoyles nicknamed Victor and Hugo. Esmeralda comes equipped with a frisky pet goat named Djali.

Gromit's creator gets animated over Bafta

Nick Park, the triple-Oscar-winning animator, last night accused organisers of Britain's top film and theatre awards of belittling his work by excluding animation from their main ceremony.

short story competition - win pounds 2,000

Ian Beck, the children's author and illustrator, and his son Laurence, aged 12, discuss books with Jenny Gilbert

Letter: BBC backs animated talent

Sir: BBC Bristol's Animation Unit is today celebrating its second Oscar win in three years. Jayne Pilling's article ("Why cartoon Britain keeps on winning", 25 March) minimises the part played by the BBC in the "success story" of British animation while accusing us of neglecting new talent and failing "to maximise the adult audience".

Why cartoon Britain keeps on winning

Animators are the success story of British film. But we risk losing them to Hollywood, warns Jayne Pilling

A film, not a plaything

TOY STORY John Lasseter (PG)

Theatre / The Jungle Book Young Vic, London

Kipling's The Jungle Book is one of that dispiritingly large group of children's classics that live constantly in the shadow of a Disney version; and while the literary originals of Winnie the Pooh and Peter Pan have managed to maintain an independent existence, it's probably the case that most children know about Kipling's characters only through their much thinner, lighter screen incarnations.

Good things in soft packages

UNSTRUNG HEROES Diane Keaton (PG) THE BROTHERS McMULLEN Edward Burns (15) ANGELS AND INSECTS Philip Haas (18) TOY STORY John Lassiter (U) A CLOSE SHAVE Nick Park (U) GHOST IN THE SHELL Mamoru Oshii (15) DR JEKYLL AND MS HYDE David Price (12)

Jump in, have a quick read, jump out

The first British magazines on CD-Rom are out, reports Sophia Chauchard-Stuart

Staring death in the face

'We can't handle death? Why should we be able to?' Tom Lubbock on a challenging exhibition at the National Museum of Photography

A heroine with pecs. Who reads. But has Disney really changed its tune on women?

Mirror, mirror on the wall, who's the most emancipated of them all? For Disney the answer is its new heroine Pocahontas who - dressed up in an off-the-shoulder rawhide number, all the better to reveal her muscular pecs - is as about as right-on as they come. After all, what contemporary live-action feature can boast a Native American female lead (albeit one who looks like an animated sister to Jane Seymour in Dr Quinn, Medicine Woman), plus one who might just put the concerns of her people before affairs of the heart? Pocahontas is the sturdy sort who can navigate a forest on her own, who is full of wisdom, courage and other honourable virtues and, most of all, doesn't have a home-making manual in sight. Poor old Snow White must be rotating gracefully in her glass coffin.

Theatre: PINOCCHIO, TEATRO KISMET Sadler's Wells, London

One of the depressing things about reading to your children is that most fairy tales are already known to them on video. The mawkish maw of Walt Disney gorges on any fable that folk literature can sling at it. Any initiative to repossess narratives purloined by Hollywood and excise the all-American show tunes deserves all the applause it can muster. Teatro Kismet did just that with their spritely production of Pinocchio.

Film / BRITISH ANIMATION ICA, London

The 12 short animated films collected in Live Wires and Raw Drawings are joined by the thinnest of threads - all of them were made by British directors - so the styles and tones and moods collide like dodgems. This may be the package's greatest asset.

It's not all Tom and Jerry

The men and women behind Britain's animation boom are a strange lot. Long live the weirdos, says Steven Poole

Bringing animation to life

Animation is one of those things that computer people say computers can do better. What, draw all those fiddly frames in between? This machine will do it for you in seconds! Which is all, as duck-haters say, perfect mallards. Craft is an essential part of this art as of any other - walk round the animation section of MOMI, for instance, and see if you don't laugh in wonderment at 60-year-old Starewicz films.
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