Arts and Entertainment Nick Allbrook, of Pond: 'Most of the music I love is made by awful musicians'

'Most of the music I love is made by awful musicians'

Preview: Snap Lomographs

What do Pulp, Brian Eno, and Yasser Arafat have in common? Answer: they are all the proud possessors of a practically invisible, pretty automatic, super-tiny, nearly silent camera from Russia. As lomographers, their aim is to take as many lomographs as possible in the most unlikely situations and from the most unusual positions. The lomographs are then collected and assembled into lomowalls (above). It's fitting then, that Britain's first ever lomo exhibition is launched this week at London's Blue Note Gallery, featuring 20,000 lomographs, from local work to lomo-imports from around the world. Can't wait to see Yasser's contribution.

MUSIC: Philip Glass; RFH, London

For a style that excels in endless repetitions and a sense of going nowhere, East-coast minimalism has shown remarkable staying power, as Philip Glass, one of its founding fathers, proved last week. Packing London's Festival Hall to capacity on Thursday and Friday, he offered a package tour of his uvre that moved from the symphonic heights and depths of his recent pieces to excerpts from classic scores of his formative period by way of chunks from three major operas. For the first night out, his most considerable exertion was signing autographs after Martyn Brabbins and the Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields had given the world premiere of his Heroes Symphony. But on Friday evening he was there on stage with the Philip Glass Ensemble, following the lead of music director Michael Riesman, yet clearly the abiding genius of this tightly knit and multi- talented group.

THE EYE: CLASSICAL & OPERA

The Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields, conducted by Martyn Brabbins, plays Philip Glass in the Royal Festival Hall (0171-960 4242) on 15 May at 7.30pm; then, on 16 May in the same venue, the Philip Glass Ensemble plays music from an eclectic selection of Glass's greatest works

Lyric Sheets

David Bowie has faced the strain of 50...

Letter: Model males

Sir: In response to Jack O'Sullivan's call for new role models for men in 1997 ("Men plumb the depths of bad behaviour", 26 December), my own hero list is: Frank Zappa, Jean-Paul Gaultier, John Kenneth Galbraith and Brian Eno.

Radio: Good news that no one wants to print

Last Sunday I wasn't really listening to my oldest radio, an ancient Bakelite wireless inherited from my aunt which can only get R4 LW - but gets it really well. It was pulsing gently to some pretty classy choral singing, which suits it.

Pop: Like Brian Eno without the concepts

Harold Budd, ambient's forefather, has been composing for 20 years. He can't play - but that doesn't bother him. He's in it for the joy. By Matt Smith

Music on Radio: Spice it up

Happy Birthday, Radio 3? In his Radio Review in this paper on Monday, Robert Hanks complained, "Essentially, it's concerned with perpetuating one quite narrow musical tradition, with little sense of the contexts that make this tradition important - that makes it more than a matter of taste." With all due respect, this, in turn, seems a rather narrow description of a network that actually strives to encompass the entire surviving repertoire of Western music over the past 1,000-odd years from vernacular medieval dance to five-hour Romantic music-drama, together with a range of contemporary activity both notated and, sometimes, improvised (Hear and Now), a fair sampling of Jazz (Jazz Notes, Impressions, Jazz Record Requests), a weekly selection of more esoteric developments in Pop (Mixing It) and fitfully, but occasionally in concentrated bursts, at least some note of the classical musics of India, Africa, Latin America, the Far East and so on (for instance, in the Traditional Music series presented this month by Brian Eno). One might well argue over the relative amounts of time Radio 3 devotes to each of these vast musical areas. Yet one will hear precious little of any of them on Radio 1.

Brian Eno's generation game

The master of ambient music is pioneering a concept that takes computerised sound into an atmospheric new dimension.

Brian Eno is 'a mammal, a celebrity and a masturbator'. And his new diary could establish him as the avant-garde Alan Clark

n the back cover of A Year with Swollen Appendices, Brian Eno's diary of 1995, he supplies a handy guide to some of the things that he is: "a mammal, an Anglo-Saxon, an uncle, a celebrity, a masturbator". Further insight into the mind of the enigmatic 47- year-old more often referred to as musician, record producer and artist is furnished by his diary entry for 26 August of last year. "Pissed into an empty bottle so I could continue watching Monty Python and suddenly thought 'I've never tasted my own piss', so I drank a little. It looked just like Orvieto Classico and tasted of nearly nothing."

Perhaps culture is just a happy accident

How does evolution produce a Masaccio fresco? That, or at least a slightly more sophisticated version of the question, is the mystery that preoccupies Professor John D Barrow in his book The Artful Universe. He isn't alone in his curiosity. Brian Eno, responding to my column about his speech at the Turner Prize dinner, puts the quest this way: "Why do we evolve culture? Why are we so interested in style? What does it do for us?"

A chance for harmony amid the Mostar ruins

CHILDREN OF WAR APPEAL

THE CRITICAL LIST: THIS WEEK'S RECOMMENDATIONS

The performance

Celebrating the sound of silence

Mention Radio 3 and most pop youths will squint at you like you're some crusty old slipper-wearing square. They'd be in for a surprise if they ever thought to tune in to The Music Machine (5pm R3), a breezy daily music magazine which encompasses all sorts of genres, from classical through pop to world music and beyond. "People think they know what Radio 3 is," Tommy Pearson, presenter, says. "We're trying to prove them wrong."

The other side of Iggy

A series of passport photographs by Iggy Pop reveals a cheery side to the godfather of punk and author of the song 'No Fun'. Taken this year, they appear in 'little pieces from big stars', an exhibition at Flowers East, London E8, curated by Brian Eno in aid of War Child, the charity which provides treatment and therapy for the children of Sarajevo. For a report on the show, see Cries & Whispers, Review, page 32
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