Arts and Entertainment

Barbican, London

London Philharmonic Orchestra/ Alsop, Royal Festival Hall, London

The platform is empty as the conductor, Marin Alsop, enters with four flutes who then proceed to sit in silence as the first downbeat of the evening produces barely audible but blissfully consonant string chords from celestially far off.

Album: Jah Wobble, Japanese Dub (30 Hertz)

He did a rather good Chinese Dub album a couple of years ago, so why not collect the set? How does it sound? How do you think it sounds?

Album: Albrecht Mayer, Voices of Bach (Decca)

On Voices Of Bach, the Berlin Philharmonic's principal oboist Albrecht Mayer adapts the vocal melodies of Bach's cantatas to fit his instrument.

Midlake, Wilton's Music Hall, London

Maestros of the minor key

First Person: 'I hear sounds in colour'

Angela Purll, 28

Album: Yannick Nezet-Seguin, Ravel: Daphnis et Chloe Suite No 2, (EMI Classics)

The young French-Canadian conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin proves particularly adept here at extracting the maximum impact from a series of Ravel waltzes and "miniatures", most notably the second suite from Daphnis et Chloé. The lushly rendered first movement's evocative sunrise music is simply gorgeous, with glimmers of cello leading to a glorious orchestral sunburst, tailing into wistfully pastoral oboe, while there are traces of the eastern flavour of the Bolero discernible in the second movement's flute arabesques and underscoring harp arpeggios.

Download this: Daphnis et Chloé Suite No 2

iPhone flutes hit high note for kids

A beat boxer, an MP3 scratcher, iPhone flutes, iPhone theramins and a host of other digital instruments played a highly unusual version of Adagio from Vivaldi’s Four Seasons in G Minor on Tuesday night as part of a nationwide campaign to get kids involved in music.

Collected Poems, By Michael Donaghy

Intimacy mixed with Bronx grit

Bud Shank: Saxophonist and flautist who pioneered West Coast jazz

When I arrived in California in this car with the fella from New York I had a clarinet, I had a flute and I had a tenor saxophone and a toothbrush and no job and no nothin'". Bud Shank was 20 and unknown when he arrived in Los Angeles in 1946, but over the next 10 years he metamorphosed into one of the best-loved alto saxophone players in the world. He was also one of the founders of West Coast jazz, with which his powerful and eloquent alto solos were strongly associated, although this bewildered him: "I don't even know what the hell West Coast jazz is", he said. "It was something different from what they were doing in New York, so the critics called it West Coast jazz." Not conforming to the fashion for "cool", smooth-toned playing, Shank remained a hot player whose intense, hard-swinging style communicated exuberance and excitement with great directness.

Album: Sara Tavares, Xinti, (World connection)

At last something different from Cape Verde, via Lisbon. Sara Tavares sings in a kittenish, almost conspiratorial manner: hers is not an art which demands attention to every note, but it's lovely to spend time with.

Album: Handel, Solo Sonatas Opus 1 – AoAM/Egarr, (Harmonia Mundi)

Richard Egarr posits a pragmatic solution to the riddle of Handel's twice- published Opus 1 Solo Sonatas in the Academy of Ancient Music's delightful double-disc set.

Album: Kathyrn Thomas, Richard Shaw, Fauré and his Circle (Deux-Elles)

For her debut album, the gifted flautist Kathryn Thomas offers pieces reflective of the late-19th century "Ars Gallica" movement in French music, a rich period for flute composition largely because of the abilities of the virtuoso Paul Taffanel.

Album: Nathan Davis, If (Soul Jazz)

It's funny how some names slip through history's net. Following his army service, Kansas City saxophonist Davis spent the Sixties in Paris, leading bands, studying ethno-musicology and turning down contracts with Art Blakey and Blue Note Records, before returning to the US to teach. This 1976 quintet session shows off his funky, spiritual chops on alto, soprano and flute in original tunes evoking Bahia, Africa, New Orleans and Cannonball Adderley. It's great.

Album: Odinn Baldvinsson & Patricia Romero, Cantilena (Divine Art)

This debut disc from the duo of flautist Baldvinsson and pianist Romero is designed to showcase the breadth of their repertoire

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