Arts and Entertainment

Crowd surfing continues with the band off-stage, a topless girl balances on a mate's shoulders and the bouncers look panicked. This year’s hotly tipped saviours of guitar rock take all this in their stride, at least until a chaotic finale, suggesting either they learn fast or this is typical of their gigs.

Arts: Once more into the bleach

Welcome to the small time. Welcome to the cheesy, self-deluding world of the tribute band - the place in which pop finally gets to eat itself. But wait. The figures say this isn't the small time at all. This is pop's Third Way.

Here we are now, entertain us

Nick Broomfield's Kurt and Courtney started life as a biopic of Kurt Cobain - the life, music and violent death of a pop icon. But now it's set its sights on censorship, fame, image manipulation. And truth. By James Mottram

Film: Pop-star posse in with a bullet

As David Bowie prepares to make a cowboy film, Pierre Perrone asks why so many musicians swap their guitars for guns

Book review / Rebels with a curse

A Riot of our Own: night and day with The Clash by Johnny Green and Garry Barker, illustrated by Ray Lowry, Indigo, pounds 8.99

THEY CAME FROM GARAGELAND

Life with the Clash was about as wild as it gets in rock 'n' roll. And road manager . Johnny Green lived it every gig of the way. Twenty years later he's telling the story

Confessions of a Labour virgin

Under a Labour government, I am to become very fat. When we woke up on the Friday, the first thing Mum said was, "Well, it's your first experience of life without the Tories. You can do whatever you like." Eager to think of the best demand we could, my sister and I conferred. "We would like chocolate and Coca-Cola for breakfast." This is the same request I made when I passed my 11-plus. "Fine," agreed Mum. And we have eaten am Coke and chocolate ever since, as if a radical revamp of old- style British breakfasts was one of the policies Peter Mandelson had been hushing up until Blair got in.

Indie's Trade secret

Acklam Road in west London was the original address of the first, and rightly legendary Rough Trade shop, which opened in 1976. Countless fans of left-field music owe their record collection to Rough Trade, who, like John Peel, have opened people's eyes to a huge world of eclectic, obscure sound. Let's face it, back in 1976 your chances of finding that limited edition New York Dolls seven inch on lurid pink vinyl in Woolworth's were pretty damn slim. And now that the alternative crowd have well and truly broken into the mainstream charts, this week of gigs, dubbed "Acklam Hall Revisited", should be seen as both a victory and anniversary celebration.

Screening blue murder

Damien Hirst (anagram: Mr Thin Ideas) is a busy old chap. Not content with prowling nocturnally around pastures and sawing unsuspecting cows in half, not even content with directing Blur's video for "Country House" last year, the bloke's gone and made a film. Twenty minutes long, starring Keith Allen and Eddie Izzard, it's called Hanging Around, and boasts a soundtrack by Pulp, The Pogues, Joe Strummer and Alex James (the cool one from Blur who plays bass with his fringe in his eyes and an insouciant fag drooping from his lips). But that's not even the main attraction of Spellbound: Art and Film, which opened yesterday, 100 years to the day since the first screening of a film in Britain. The purpose of this mega culture-fest is to examine the passionate relationship that art and film have enjoyed throughout the century. Try some of these intriguing prospects: an exhibition of original storyboards, paintings and scripts for Ridley Scott's seminal sci-fi epics, Alien and Blade Runner; a dramatic installation by Peter Greenaway starring five real actors in a glass box; a phantasmagorical film set by Pop-Art genius Eduardo Paolozzi; Disney- inspired paintings by Paula Rego; and an interactive video installation by Terry Gilliam, based around his extraordinary film Brazil. Possibly the strangest concept of the lot comes in the shape of Douglas Gordon's 24 Hour Psycho (below). Gordon has decided to slow Hitchcock's classic down to the rate of three frames per second, so the director's craft in mise-en-scene and cutting is made nakedly evident. The title is erroneous, but 24 Hour Psycho's two special screenings still last a fundament-numbing 18 hours apiece. That's more like it. Why let cattle have all the fun? Let's suffer for art ourselves.

PUNK SURVIVORS

JOHNNY ROTTEN, the pale anarchist who screamed "No Future" and wore "Destroy" on his chest when he led the Sex Pistols is now the lithe and tanned John Lydon, who wrote his catty memoirs under the Californian sun. He makes the occasional alternative rock album with his band Public Image Limited.

FILM / Taking the slow lane to success: Despite the promise of his early films, Alex Cox was going nowhere. Until Highway Patrolman. Kevin Jackson reveals how the director of Repo Man has reclaimed critical triumph from ideological defeat

Another triumph for the British cinema: the latest film by a young(ish) English director opens in Los Angeles and is lauded by the local press with such extravagant phrases as 'superbly structured', 'an epic quality, moral as well as visual' and 'beautiful . . . a classic odyssey'. Before summoning up the crates of celebratory bubbly, however, patriots should reflect on one or two qualifying details: this 'British' film was written by a Peruvian, financed by Japan and shot in Mexico, using an all-local, all-Hispanophone cast and crew. Oh yes: it was also completed in 1991, and has taken three years to struggle its way back to its director's native land.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
Josephine Dickinson: 'A cochlear implant helped me to discover a new world of sound'

Josephine Dickinson: 'How I discovered a new world of sound'

After going deaf as a child, musician and poet Josephine Dickinson made do with a hearing aid for five decades. Then she had a cochlear implant - and everything changed
Greggs Google fail: Was the bakery's response to its logo mishap a stroke of marketing genius?

Greggs gives lesson in crisis management

After a mishap with their logo, high street staple Greggs went viral this week. But, as Simon Usborne discovers, their social media response was anything but half baked
Matthew McConaughey has been singing the praises of bumbags (shame he doesn't know how to wear one)

Matthew McConaughey sings the praises of bumbags

Shame he doesn't know how to wear one. Harriet Walker explains the dos and don'ts of fanny packs
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

The midfielder returned to the Premier League after two years last weekend. The controversial character had much to discuss after his first game back
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home
Lauded therapist Harley Mille still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Lauded therapist still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Australian Harley Miller is as frustrated by court delays as she is with the idiosyncrasies of immigration law
Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world. But could his predictions of war do the same?

Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world...

But could his predictions of war do the same?