Arts and Entertainment

The Good Wife on More4 is in the midst of a reputation revision. Long-term fans of the smart, glossy legal drama, which began its fifth season on More4 last night, often complain it's not given the recognition it deserves. It's true that among crime and law procedurals (TV shows where a problem is raised and solved within a single episode) this is a show of unusual quality. But is The Good Wife really that good?

Nina Conti and friends

Nina Conti: a Ventriloquist's Story, BBC4, Sunday
Dead Boss, BBC3, Thursday
Louis Theroux: Twighlight of the Porn Stars, BBC2, Sunday

A ventriloquist at a career crossroads lets her dummy show the way – to poignant effect

When the Devil Drives, By Chris Brookmyre

A midsummer night's murder mystery

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Kensington Gardens, London; Ragtime, Regent's Park Open Air Theatre, London; Atigone, NT Olivier, London

Two book adaptations join the season's outdoor productions, while a Greek tragedy exiles Antigone to Sixties corporate America

Life is a Dream, Argyle Works, Birmingham

When the young Pierre Boulez said that opera houses should be blown up, he was attacking, not opera, but its cultural ambience- the snobbery, exclusivity and expense.

Album: Antonio Pappano, Rolando Villazon, Sophie Koch, Massenet: Werther (Deutsche Grammophon)

For a two-hour opera, not an awful lot happens in Werther – boy is denied girl, and sulks his way to suicide – but the status of Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther as the foundation stone of Romantic self-absorption means Massenet's opera is more character study than narrative.

Women in operas can't resist a rake

Things do not look good for Anne Truelove. "No word from Tom," she sings, while her beloved vanishes to London, led astray by the sinister Nick Shadow. That is just the start of her problems. Stravinsky's neoclassical masterpiece, The Rake's Progress, concludes with a heartbreaking scene in which Anne sings her Tom a lullaby as he dies by inches in the lunatic asylum of Bedlam.

Women can't resist a rake

Things do not look good for Anne Truelove. "No word from Tom," she sings, while her beloved vanishes to London, led astray by the sinister Nick Shadow. That is just the start of her problems. Stravinsky's neoclassical masterpiece, The Rake's Progress, concludes with a heartbreaking scene in which Anne sings her Tom a lullaby as he dies by inches in the lunatic asylum of Bedlam.

Grainger will compete in the 2012 games and has inspired the 'LTS Row' collection for Long Tall Sally

My Secret Life: Katherine Grainger, 36, Olympic Rower

'I wanted to join the circus'

Totem, Royal Albert Hall, London

Cirque du Soleil has a highly successful formula that surrounds strong, polished circus acts with bombastic glitter and vaguely uplifting sentiment.

My Edinburgh: The Boy with Tape on His Face, comedian

As a silent act, I enjoy the noise of Edinburgh during the Fringe. The tourist shops selling "Scotty" caps complete with ginger hair wouldn't be the same without blasting bagpipes covering "Fly me to the Moon". The shout of street performers, who block off the mile and all read from a universal script, would be a mere whisper if it was reduced to slow hand claps and the smell of jugglers (white spirit and cabbages). It's the constant babble of people summing up their shows in 10 seconds that you manage to tune out. Occasionally, it is nice to tune it back in again and have a listen.

David Shillinglaw's new exhibition: a picture preview

A new collection of works by David Shillinglaw will bring together a selection of art hoping to reflect 'the constant search for and consumption of that which makes us complete'

Win tickets to see The Flying Karamazov Brothers

The funniest, most diverting 100 minutes you’ll spend all summer

Last Night's TV: Agatha Christie's Marple/ITV1<br />Wonderland &ndash; The Kids Who Play with Fire/BBC2<br />Fisherman's Friends/ITV1

I don't know whether you care why they didn't ask Evans or not, but if you're hoping for clarification here I'm afraid I'm going to have to disappoint you. I didn't know the answer before I watched Agatha Christie's Marple, never having read that particular novel, and I'm no wiser now that I have. I can tell you who Evans was, because he was played by Mark Williams, who could read out the fine print on a phone contract and make it interesting. Or at least I can tell you who one Evans was, because I was vaguely aware – through the light coma of the final explanation scene – that another Evans was sprung on us at the final moment. But I'm afraid I don't know what they should have asked Evans or why exactly this question was connected to the dying man who'd croaked it out two achingly long hours earlier. I fought sleep valiantly, I promise you, but there were a couple of moments when it had me pinned for a while.

Silence, Hampstead Theatre, London

Silence may seem a paradoxical title for a show by the excellent Filter, one of whose fortes is using sound to sound the depths of a theme or dramatic situation.

Slightly Fat Features: Variety in the House, Roundhouse, London

A man runs naked from the sea, gathering clothes as his journey progresses on land – a Reggie Perrin-esque escapade in reverse. So opens this family-friendly variety show that, for the most part, covers itself in credit.

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Indiana serial killer? Man arrested for murdering teenage prostitute confesses to six other murders - and police fear there could be many more

A new American serial killer?

Police fear man arrested for murder of teen prostitute could be responsible for killing spree dating back 20 years
Online petitions: Sign here to change the world

Want to change the world? Just sign here

The proliferation of online petitions allows us to register our protests at the touch of a button. But do they change anything?
How to Get Away with Murder: Shonda Rhimes reinvents the legal drama

How to Get Away with Murder

Shonda Rhimes reinvents the legal drama
A cup of tea is every worker's right

Hard to swallow

Three hospitals in Leicester have banned their staff from drinking tea and coffee in public areas. Christopher Hirst explains why he thinks that a cuppa is every worker's right
Which animals are nearly extinct?

Which animals are nearly extinct?

Conservationists in Kenya are in mourning after the death of a white northern rhino, which has left the species with a single male. These are the other species on the brink
12 best children's shoes

Perfect for leaf-kicking: 12 best children's shoes

Find footwear perfect to keep kids' feet protected this autumn
Two super-sized ships have cruised into British waters, but how big can these behemoths get?

Super-sized ships: How big can they get?

Two of the largest vessels in the world cruised into UK waters last week
British doctors on brink of 'cure' for paralysis with spinal cord treatment

British doctors on brink of cure for paralysis

Sufferers can now be offered the possibility of cure thanks to a revolutionary implant of regenerative cells
Let's talk about loss

We need to talk about loss

Secrecy and silence surround stillbirth
Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Will there be an all-female mission to Mars?

Women may be better suited to space travel than men are
Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why