Album: Gonjasufi, MU.ZZ.LE (Warp)

"Experimental" best describes the third album by this Mexican-Ethiopian-Californian yoga teacher.

The Art of Fielding, By Chad Harbach

It's a very good swing, just not quite knocked out of the park

Album: Tino Contreras, El Jazz Mexicano de Tino Contreras (Jazzman)

Pre-Columbian jazz? The Mexican drummer and bandleader Tino Contreras pioneered the fusion of groovy, "Take Five"-like 1960s modernism with elements based on Aztec ritual and symbolism.

Da Vinci's Ghost, By Toby Lester

Surely not another book about Leonardo! Can there really be space for it? Yes, because this one is more than the description of a great drawing, the so-called "Vitruvian Man", executed in 1490. It demonstrates, with skill and lightly worn erudition, how Leonardo, aged 38, came to make his drawing of the naked human body of a spread-eagled, mature young man (which may be a rare self-portrait of the artist) set within a circle and a square.

Haunted Child, Royal Court, London (3/5)

Actors are required to do some rum things in the line of duty.

Deafblind artists give unique vision of the world

An insight into the unique perspective on life of people with neither sight nor hearing is being provided by an exhibition of artwork by two deafblind artists.

Shane Williams scores his final try for Wales in the final minute in unorthodox fashion on Saturday

James Lawton: This was a big finish by the little genius – but is he the last of his kind?

Coming right at the end of both the match and an astonishing international career, it was the almost eerily appropriate departure of arguably the most relentessly mischievous gnome in the history of his or any other sport.

Shane Williams scores his final try for Wales in the final minute in unorthodox fashion on Saturday

James Lawton: Huge finish by little genius – but is he the last of his kind?

As rugby gets bigger and stronger and heavier, perhaps there was a hint of lament

Storms at home and overseas: Julian Barnes,
Man Booker winner

Fiction: Histories in a spin

Some of the year's most striking home-grown fiction combined enjoyment with enlightenment to draw revealing maps of the nation. You might begin a tour with Justin Cartwright's Other People's Money (Bloomsbury, £12.99), his droll, sharp and deftly-crafted tale of private bankers and public downfall: an astute alignment of social satire and family saga.

1Q84: Book One and Book Two, By Haruki Murakami, trs Jay Rubin

Everything under the two moons

The River Line, Jermyn Street Theatre, London

Here is the kind of rediscovery at which Jermyn Street Theatre excels. Once renowned as a novelist and a playwright and for 15 years the chief theatre critic of The Times, Charles Morgan is no longer a name to conjure with. But Anthony Biggs's deeply absorbing revival of his forgotten 1952 play, The River Line, makes a strong case for its morally searching power and beauty and could help put this author back on the map.

First Night: A Dangerous Method, Venice Film Festival

Freud takes on Jung – but Knightley wins by a head

John Walsh: Nomads who've earned a home

It's ironic that what has annoyed Basildon Council about the 80-odd Irish Traveller families, who today face eviction from the Dale Farm site in Essex, is that they don't actually travel anywhere. For a collection of nomads who call themselves, in Gaelic, Lucht Siuil – "the walking people" – they seem surprisingly static.

Musical magic for everyone at the Dartington estate

The story goes that the Dartington estate near Totnes gathers an atmosphere of unmatchable mysticism from south Devon's ancient spiritual sites and ley lines. So far, so New Age. But at Dartington's famous International Summer School of Music (DISS) the magic seems real: it's impossible not to be caught up in it.

Fine wine galore! Hong Kong's buried treasure

Underground vaults conceal a priceless liquid hoard. Clifford Coonan reports

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Baroness Lane-Fox warned that large companies such as have become so powerful that governments and regulators are left behind
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Keith Fraser says we should give Isis sympathises free flights to join Isis (AFP)
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Google celebrates the 126th anniversary of the Eiffel Tower opening its doors to the public for the first time
techGoogle celebrates Paris's iconic landmark, which opened to the public 126 years ago today
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Cleopatra the tortoise suffers from a painful disease that causes her shell to disintegrate; her new prosthetic one has been custom-made for her using 3D printing technology
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Arts and Entertainment
Coachella and Lollapalooza festivals have both listed the selfie stick devices as “prohibited items”
music
Sport
Nigel Owens was targeted on Twitter because of his sexuality during the Six Nations finale between England and France earlier this month
rugbyReferee Nigel Owens on coming out, and homophobic Twitter abuse
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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
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No postcode? No vote

Floating voters

How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

By Reason of Insanity

Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

Power dressing is back

But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

Caves were re-opened to the public
'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

Vince Cable interview

'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor