Independent Plus

Listen to the tracks mentioned in Caught in the Net below:

The Knack: How to stand up straight

The Knack

The Knack: How to get a pay-rise, by Richard Denny

When asking for a pay-rise, one has to accept that it is a sales process. You must persuade your employer that it is in their interest to pay you more. But you should be looking to see what you put into the organisation before you ask or more out of it. Ask yourself: do I do more than is expected? Am I reliable? Am I indispensable? If you're all of these, you're in a position of strength and getting a pay-rise will be easy.

The Knack: How to throw a party

Throwing a party is the equivalent to putting your name up in lights on Broadway. So think of all the facets that make a party memorable to you and adopt them; set out to create the style of party you would just have to attend!

The Knack: How to win at Monopoly

"Personally, I've never taken Monopoly too seriously. Even though my Dad was the first winner of the Monopoly Championships in 1972, we only ever played occasionally as a family, so it wasn't very competitive.

The Knack: How to teach an old dog new tricks, by Roy Page

"I don't know why people say you can't teach an old dog new tricks. It's certainly more difficult to teach them, for the same reason that it's difficult for an older person to learn something new. There's a general attitude in life that the older you get the less likely you are to accept change, but that doesn't apply to everybody, and it doesn't apply to dogs. Everything a dog learns is done by routine. If you start them when they're young, they'll learn quickly. If they're older, you'll have to break their old habits first. In these circumstances, patience is a virtue. Training methods have changed dramatically since I started 20 years ago. In those days, it was put the lead on and yank the dog around. Now, you would speak to your dog in a kind voice and the teaching would be done in a sort of play method. If you've got a dog that pulls your arms out of your sockets, get his attention with a toy or a titbit, use the lead gently and give him a reward when he walks to heel. This could be food, or just a bit of fuss. I only have to change the tone of my voice and say `You're a naughty boy' and my dog has his tail between his legs.

The Knack How to win at conkers, by Paul Vjestica

"Four of us from work first entered the competition last year. We got two or three rounds in and no further. Because we're all engineers, we analysed what happened. We considered that a downward strike wasn't the best approach because the string of your opponent's conker absorbed most of the impact and yours would come off worse. So we thought we'd try the sideways swipe.

The Knack: How to write a poem

Never rhyme id with lid, advises Brian Patten

The Knack: How to tell a joke

Keep it short and don't attempt accents, says Jenny Eclair

METRO CHOICE: Getting paid

Slackers are largely an invention of a desperate media, scrambling around for umbrella terms - New Queer Cinema, New Wave Of New Wave - to define an era. But you see the plaid shirts and goatee beards and you think: well, something must be afoot. Either that or they've all been shopping at The Gap. If you suspect a friend or relative of yours to be a "slacker", try this simple test. Show them Ben Stiller's self-conscious slacker film Reality Bites. Do they run screaming from the room to the sanctuary of a joint? If so, they're the real McCoy. The genuine king of the genre is Richard Linklater, whose beguiling films Slacker and Dazed and Confused are being screened as part of the NFT's season "A Slacker's Guide To Film". There's also the seminal Stranger Than Paradise, Gus Van Sant's Drugstore Cowboy and a fair proportion of turkeys in slackers' clothing (Naked in New York, Bodies, Rest And Motion). Plus a preview of Linklater's new movie, Before Sunrise (opening here on 21 April), which stars Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy (below) as two strangers who spend a day together in Vienna. Sounds riveting, huh? Don't be sarcastic; it's, like, a real dream, man.

Review / The new wave: Annette Morreau on Simon Rattle and the CBSO at the Proms

If any proof were needed of the continuing value of the symphony orchestra to contemporary music, it must be Mark-Anthony Turnage's four-year 'residence' with the CBSO and Sir Simon Rattle. Its culmination, a monumental farewell gift to an orchestra and a conductor who have allowed him to mature into one of today's most gifted composers, Drowned Out, which had its London premiere at the Proms on Thursday, is a work of astonishing facility, brimming over with confidence and vitality. Lasting about 23 minutes, and scored for large orchestra - Mahlerian in proportion but with de rigueur saxophones - it was inspired by William Golding's novel Pincher Martin. Turnage, in a pre-Prom talk, spoke of his need for titles as a stimulus, but added that he doesn't want the work to be taken as a literal description of drowning (as offered in Golding's novel) even if it does convey a palpable sense of terror and of life passing away. The opening sombre tolling of bells against a mournful, funereal theme in the cellos and basses evokes memories of Britten's Sinfonia da Requiem, a work Turnage much admires, although he shrinks from being considered an 'English' composer. The central section is a breath-taking, glittering dance, showing how convincingly Turnage has found an identity of his own that captures the vitality of jazz and street music without any hint of 'fashion'. After a screaming climax, the final section returns to the mood of the opening, quietly ending with a long, desolate clarinet solo.

Here Today: The New Wave revival

Something's afoot at the Camden Palace. A dodgy indie disco, usually frequented by drop-outs with long, lanky hair and Suede T-shirts, its habitues have gone all smart. Suddenly, everyone's turning up in natty suits, shirts and ties: especially the girls. The unisex hairstyle is a short, slick bob, tucked beneath one ear. It all looks so very . . . early Eighties.
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Bruges
Lake Como
Burgundy
South AFrica
Paris
Northern Corsica
Prices correct as of 21 November 2014
In a world of Saudi bullying, right-wing Israeli ministers and the twilight of Obama, Iran is looking like a possible policeman of the Gulf

Iran is shifting from pariah to possible future policeman of the Gulf

Robert Fisk on our crisis with Iran
The young are the new poor: A third of young people pushed into poverty

The young are the new poor

Sharp increase in the number of under-25s living in poverty
Greens on the march: ‘We could be on the edge of something very big’

Greens on the march

‘We could be on the edge of something very big’
Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby - through the stories of his accusers

Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby

Through the stories of his accusers
Why are words like 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?

The Meaning of Mongol

Why are the words 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible