Arts and Entertainment For music lovers: John Cusack with his vinyl collection in 'High Fidelity'

As a former couple go to court in a bid to carve up their record collection, Tom Hodgkinson rejoices in the fact that our love affair with vinyl is far from over

Theme Song for an Old Show, By Jeffrey Lewis

For some novels, the first-person form seems extraordinarily well chosen, and so it is here. Louie, the narrator, is a TV writer on a superior TV cop show, Northie (Lewis's own experience as a writer on Hill Street Blues no doubt comes in handy). The novel looks back at his whole life, from the time his father, a TV producer, left home for another woman, deftly laying bare the tensions this produced between Louie and both his parents; his uneasy relationships with friends, women and colleagues; the arc of his writing career; his failed attempt to preserve the integrity of his show; and his efforts to get closer to his father as his own star rises and his father's declines.

Diary: A screenwriter writes

Aaron Sorkin, the screenwriter behind The Social Network, may not be a regular Facebook user, but he sure knows his way around a blog. Since his film's release in the US, its ecstatic reviews have been tinged with criticism of its few female characters, described by one publication as, "horrendous, like, 50s era sexist". Wounded by the claims of misogyny, Sorkin has hit back by writing a lengthy rebuttal in the comments section of television writer Ken Levine's blog.

Leading article: Feeling ruff

We should not really be surprised by the news that dogs experience emotions, or that there are some canines prone to pessimism and others of a more naturally sunny nature.

Encounter, By Milan Kundera

Although this cluster of essays on his favourite pioneers (translated by Linda Asher) does not offer the overarching theorem of a treatise such as The Curtain, Encounter proves that Kundera the critic bracingly matches Kundera the novelist.

Boring Conference 2010: Chairman of the bored

Having long pondered life's least interesting topics, James Ward has organised a conference to explore them further

Dominic Lawson: Kill a schoolchild. How hilarious

Richard Curtis will have his latest film hanging round his neck like a stinking fish for as long as he is successful enough to be worth mocking

Takers (12A)

Coming only a week after The Town, this cops'n'robbers action thriller looks a very coarse bit of work.

Diary: A soft-rock coalition

Miliband (E) was understandably keen to distance himself from David Cameron during his first leader's speech yesterday. Despite their divergent politics, however, it seems the party heads share a taste for 1980s-inflected MOR soft-rock.

Irving Ravetch: Screenwriter and producer who garnered Oscar nominations for his adventurous literary adaptations

The screenwriter and occasional film producer Irving Ravetch was best known for the screenplays he wrote with his wife, Harriet Frank Jr, including two films for which they were nominated for Oscars, Hud (1963) and Norma Rae (1979).

David Hare: 'The sort of films I write have collapsed'

David Hare has written intelligent and accessible drama for both screen and theatre. Here, he talks to Clemency Burton-Hill about the state of the arts in Britain and the loss of support for radical new work

Cinema weathers the storm in Venice

The world's oldest film festival lost some of its glamour this year but regained its focus on the movies. Geoffrey Macnab reports

DVD: Date Night (15)

The wonderful Tina Fey and Steve Carell star in this old-fashioned screwball comedy.

First Night: Black Swan, Venice Film Festival, Opening Gala

Portman's scintillating turn as prima ballerina opens Venice festival in style

Jonathan Ross returning to the BBC

Jonathan Ross is to return to the BBC less than three months after his high-profile departure, to host a movie awards show, it was announced today.

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