News A statue depicting a Neanderthal. Scientists have discovered that Neanderthal genes passed on to modern humans could affect our likelihood of developing auto-immune diseases.

The likelihood of people developing diseases including type two diabetes and Crohn's could be affected by genes inherited from Neanderthals

THE BOOK REVIEW

LIFE ON A MODERN PLANET Richard D North Manchester University Press, £25/£10.99

A gallery opens - after 18,000 years

The masterpieces discovered in a French cave will help unravel the myst eries of Stone Age art, says David Keys

Dam threatens Stone Age carvings

DOZENS of rare Stone Age carvings in a remote area of Portugal are posing a problem for the Portuguese government.

SCIENCE / Flesh on the bones of early man

LAST month's announcement of the discovery of Australopithecus ramidus, which some have called the 'missing link', was an intriguing clue to understanding the evolution of humans from our ape-like ancestors. More details of the complex story of human pre-history are emerging from other archaeological finds in the cradle of humanity - Africa. The aim eventually is to address the big questions in evolution: how, when and why did humans arise?

Stone-Age Mike Tyson was gnawed by a wolf

BRITAIN'S oldest known inhabitant was built like Mike Tyson and may have met his end, at the age of about 20 - in the jaws of a wolf.

Travel: A breath of fresh air from the Stone Age: Forget the leprechauns and long-winded folk songs: an archaeological excavation in Co Mayo has unearthed a thriving farming settlement of 6,000 years ago, says Sean Coughlan

About 6,000 years ago, when Rome was but a couple of goat sheds and the pyramids were still waiting for planning permission, a prehistoric crowd was hanging out in Ceide, Co Mayo, on the west coast of Ireland. With a mild climate, year-round grazing and a view of the sea, Ceide had plenty to offer the upwardly-mobile neolithic family.

World heritage status sought for Stone Age site: Discovery at Boxgrove 30 times bigger than thought

ONE OF Europe's oldest Stone Age sites - which hit the headlines earlier this summer when archaeologists found a 500,000-year-old human bone there - may be at least 30 times bigger than has so far been revealed.

ARCHAEOLOGY: Boxgrove Man reveals his Stone Age-old secrets

Archaeologists plan to reconstruct the diet, lifestyle, medical history and even age at death of the Stone Age man whose half- million-year-old leg bone was recently found in a gravel pit at Boxgrove in Sussex.

It's the flopstones as film hits the yabba-dabba-doo-doo: Phil Reeves in Los Angeles reports on the US critics' clubbing of 'The Flintstones'

PARENTS, pray that this summer is not wet. Hollywood's effort to cash in on the school holiday market by turning The Flintstones, the cartoon sitcom about cave people, into a flesh-and-blood blockbuster appears to have got off to . . . well, a rocky start.

We know where they're coming from: What happened to Neanderthal Man? Where did Homo sapiens appear? Why are there so many blonds in the Lake District? Steve Jones, winner of the Science Book Prize, and his colleagues in genetics are coming up with the answers. Steve Connor reports

There is a part of Little England that will forever be a little Flemish. Little England, a small peninsula in South Wales that sticks out into the Irish Sea, contains the genetic remnants of the Flemish craftsmen brought over by William the Conqueror soon after 1066. The present-day inhabitants of this part of the Pembrokeshire coast have genes that are quite distinct from their Welsh neighbours, but similar to the people now living in Flanders. It is a poignant reminder that our genes can help tell the story of human history because they constitute a library of the dead, as well as of the living.

Sussex site yields oldest human find in Britain

THE OLDEST human remains to be found in Britain have been unearthed in a Sussex quarry.

Oldest European

Remains of what could be the oldest man in Europe - believed to date back 500,000 years - have been unearthed in West Sussex. Archaeologists digging at an Old Stone Age site in Boxgrove found a fragment of a limb among animal bones. English Heritage said full details of the find, 100,000 years older than any previously located remains, would be released shortly.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science: Stone Age exit from Africa revised

OUR Stone Age ancestors went for a walkabout almost a million years earlier than was thought, according to an anthropologist.

Silly Questions: Toeing the line

HOW DID Stone Age man cut his toenails? There are two major schools of thought: Mark Salisbury and John Bartlett have independently come to the conclusion that Stone Age woman nibbled her mate's nails. This rudimentary act evolved into the practice of toe-sucking still seen in atavistic sections of society.

Parents win last-minute victory in school curriculum review: 'Neanderthals' to join advisory groups. Fran Abrams reports

PARENTS have been given seats on the advisory groups that, from next week, are to slim down the national curriculum. The last-minute move follows complaints that ministers' talk of bringing more 'parent power' into education has brought few results.
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project