News A statue depicting a Neanderthal. Scientists have discovered that Neanderthal genes passed on to modern humans could affect our likelihood of developing auto-immune diseases.

The likelihood of people developing diseases including type two diabetes and Crohn's could be affected by genes inherited from Neanderthals

In the beginning was the gene

Are science books becoming the tracts of a new religion? Tom Wilkie considers three new reinterpretations of the creation story

Health and happiness the Flintstone way

Geoffrey Lean on a call for Stone Age lifestyles

Ancient culture discovered in Amazon

Archaeological find: 14,000-year-old paintings offer clue to human evolution

LIMBS ANCIENT AND MODERN

Long stereotyped as primitive, aggressive and thick, Neanderthal man was thought to be the predecessor of the brighter, lighter Cro-Magnons. In fact they may have been exact contemporaries in the Levant. Did they ever meet?

Flute discovery blows a hole in the Neanderthal myth

FOR MODERN humanity, music may be the food of love - but in its original form it may well have been invented by creatures with a more brutish reputation. A recent archaeological discovery suggests that our species was not the first to make music. Instead, the credit should go to Neanderthal man, the pre-human species that Homo sapiens helped to drive into extinction.

Britons kidnapped on expedition to 'Stone Age' jungle

IAN MacKINNON

'First European' lived in Spain

PEOPLE started colonising Europe up to a million years earlier than previously thought, according to new archaeological evidence. A spectacular series of discoveries in southern Spain is revealing that Europe's first inhabitants arrived more than 1.1 million years ago - perhaps as far back as 1.6 million years.

His name is a common term of abuse. It's time Neanderthal man got a better press, argues Colin Tudge

Never have human beings been more notoriously abused than the Neanderthals. They bestrode the Near East and Europe for hundreds of thousands of years, beleaguering the mammoths and outfacing the giant cave bears while, in the north, they survived fearsome encroachments of ice. In the end - 35,000 years ago - they were ousted only by other human beings: our own modern ancestors, who evidently arrived in Europe from the south about 40,000 years ago. But ever since the first Neanderthal skeletons were discovered in the 19th century, scientists and popular commentators alike have queued up to insult them.

Oldest tooth bridges gap in history

DAVID KEYS

A dental clue to life in Britain 500,000 years ago

Archaeological breakthrough: Tooth discovery in Sussex gravel pit sheds new light on Britain's first inhabitants

Hey, suet bum: big bottoms are in, or rather, out

No more buttock-clenching exercises, girls. Why not try poop padding instead? Caroline Sarll reports

Cave art backs 'human revolution'

Pre-history/ dating challenged

SCIENCE: BRAINBOX

ONE OF the greatest mysteries of the brain is how and why it evolved. There is little doubt that it is the supreme achievement of natural selection, the force that drives evolution. The human brain has quite literally transformed life on Earth. How did this occur?

Letter: No bones about it

From Mr Simon Denison

Making an exhibition of yourself

There are museums devoted to teddy bears, musical boxes, piggy banks - so why not sex? Unsurprisingly, it's in Amsterdam. Lyndsay Russell joined other culture lovers
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