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Brian Sollit was a real-life Willy Wonka, one of Britain's most eminent chocolatiers. In a career spanning over 50 years at Rowntree's in York, he created some of the nation's best loved snacks including Lion Bars, Drifters, Matchmakers and the Yorkie, but his crowning glory was the creation of the After Eight Mint. Launched in 1962, it was an instant success, becoming the must-have confectionery for "posh" after-dinner treats. It went on to sell in over 50 countries and had famous devotees such as the Queen Mother.

Milk chocolate wins a reprieve from Brussels

THERE is fresh news from the front in the Great Chocolate War - traditional British milk chocolate has been saved by the Brussels bureaucrats.

The Weasel:

Spotting the steaming ladle poised in her hand, I deemed it wise to avoid any criticism

Solution to chewing gum's sticky problem

NON-STICK chewing gum could be on the streets - not literally you understand - within the next five years, a leading manufacturer said yesterday.

Gates gets a pasting from the custard pie champion

One of the world's richest man received an unexpected pasting yesterday, as unidentified pranksters in Brussels hurled a pie at Bill Gates.

Jazz: Getting hip with the Habsburgs

Vienna is not the first place one associates with jazz, but, enthuses Phil Johnson, some work compares favourably with America.

RIGHT TO THE BITTER END

It's time to stop demonising chocolate and start enjoying it, says Michael Bateman, who suggests a variety of ways to deal with the cocoa bean

All because the lady loves vegetable fat...

Britain's chocolate is under threat from rival confectioners on the Continent who argue that our product is not pure enough to merit the name. As the British scored an important victory this week, Amanda Kelly tries to discover what makes a 'real' bar of chocolate.

Cinema: When breaking in is hard to do

A Group of small-time crooks plan a heist; it goes badly wrong. If I had a vanilla slice for every post-Tarantino film I've seen with that synopsis, I could open my own cake shop. Alan Taylor's Palookaville (15) employs a plot, an environment and an idiolect familiar from a gaggle of recent low to mid-budget thrillers, but thankfully, this film isn't just a lot of gunfights punctuated by fastidious conversations about fast food. Instead, it's a po-mo crime caper with a social conscience, in which three New Jersey deadenders turn to crime to make ends meet. And here's the twist: Taylor's gang of three don't blow anyone's brains out or double- cross each other; they don't even get hubristic on anyone's ass. They're just too nice for that. So nice, in fact, that some of the film's events have the nostalgic, optimistic warmth of Ealing comedy. Imagine if Charles Crichton had directed Reservoir Dogs, and you've a fair idea of what sort of a place Palookaville is.

Cheesed off

Letter from a low country

Travel rail journeys: More than just England's prettiest railway

The Settle to Carlisle line passes through some of northern England's most beautiful scenery. But don't forget, says Mike Gerrard, it took the lives of more than 200 navvies

Confectioners get set for sweet talking

The continuing power of such brands as Mars, Kit-Kat and Smarties demonstrates the essentially conservative nature of the confectionery business. However, according to the organisers of an international conference taking place early next month (2-3 June), this situation is changing.

Alcoholic ice lollies recalled

Kwik Save supermarket chain yesterday ordered the recall of a faulty batch of ice lollipops which ferment into alcohol, after a mother gave them to her two young children.

High street stays subdued in February

Shopping was subdued last month, according to the latest survey from the UK's leading employers' association. The Confederation of British Industry's monthly Distributive Trades Survey showed retailers reporting lower sales than expected in February, with only a few sectors experiencing strong growth. Companies have also revised their price expectations downwards.

You shall go to the ball

THE BROADER PICTURE

Knead a new-look house?

Not content with redesigning their favourite bakers shop, Azman Owens Architects ripped out the innards of a dilapidated Georgian house for cake king Gerhard Jenne. Marcus Field visited the serene home created on London's South Bank serene home in the shadow of Waterloo station
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Prices correct as of 17 September 2014
Scottish referendum: The Yes vote was the love that dared speak its name, but it was not to be

Despite the result, this is the end of the status quo

Boyd Tonkin on the fall-out from the Scottish referendum
Manolo Blahnik: The high priest of heels talks flats, Englishness, and why he loves Mary Beard

Manolo Blahnik: Flats, Englishness, and Mary Beard

The shoe designer who has been dubbed 'the patron saint of the stiletto'
The Beatles biographer reveals exclusive original manuscripts of some of the best pop songs ever written

Scrambled eggs and LSD

Behind The Beatles' lyrics - thanks to Hunter Davis's original manuscript copies
'Normcore' fashion: Blending in is the new standing out in latest catwalk non-trend

'Normcore': Blending in is the new standing out

Just when fashion was in grave danger of running out of trends, it only went and invented the non-trend. Rebecca Gonsalves investigates
Dance’s new leading ladies fight back: How female vocalists are now writing their own hits

New leading ladies of dance fight back

How female vocalists are now writing their own hits
Mystery of the Ground Zero wedding photo

A shot in the dark

Mystery of the wedding photo from Ground Zero
His life, the universe and everything

His life, the universe and everything

New biography sheds light on comic genius of Douglas Adams
Save us from small screen superheroes

Save us from small screen superheroes

Shows like Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D are little more than marketing tools
Reach for the skies

Reach for the skies

From pools to football pitches, rooftop living is looking up
These are the 12 best hotel spas in the UK

12 best hotel spas in the UK

Some hotels go all out on facilities; others stand out for the sheer quality of treatments
These Iranian-controlled Shia militias used to specialise in killing American soldiers. Now they are fighting Isis, backed up by US airstrikes

Widespread fear of Isis is producing strange bedfellows

Iranian-controlled Shia militias that used to kill American soldiers are now fighting Isis, helped by US airstrikes
Topshop goes part Athena poster, part last spring Prada

Topshop goes part Athena poster, part last spring Prada

Shoppers don't come to Topshop for the unique
How to make a Lego masterpiece

How to make a Lego masterpiece

Toy breaks out of the nursery and heads for the gallery
Meet the ‘Endies’ – city dwellers who are too poor to have fun

Meet the ‘Endies’ – city dwellers who are too poor to have fun

Urbanites are cursed with an acronym pointing to Employed but No Disposable Income or Savings
Paisley’s decision to make peace with IRA enemies might remind the Arabs of Sadat

Ian Paisley’s decision to make peace with his IRA enemies

His Save Ulster from Sodomy campaign would surely have been supported by many a Sunni imam