Arts and Entertainment Damien Hirst,

Damien Hirst has today unveiled a new spot painting based on Disney character Mickey Mouse.

Great art? Street art? Pop art?

By Phil Johnson

Visual Arts: The Katz whiskers?

A relative unknown on this side of the Atlantic, the American artist Alex Katz will reach a wider public with a new exhibition this week

Review: Videos

The People vs Larry Flynt (18). Vigorously airbrushed, Milos Forman's impassioned biopic of the Hustler publisher is styled primarily as a celebration of the First Amendment. The screenplay, by Ed Wood scribes Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski, provides sharp, memorable characterisations, and the actors respond accordingly. Woody Harrelson plays Flynt as a lovable goof ball (pissing off Gloria Steinem in the process); a wonderfully composed Courtney Love is sweet, sad, and funny as his wife Althea, a stripper turned heroin addict; the promising Edward Norton, as Flynt's fresh-faced lawyer, attacks his righteous courtroom diatribes with relish; and the terminally underused Crispin Glover shines in a delightfully bewildering minor role. Resorting too often to feelgood, all-American flag-waving, it entertains far more than it enlightens.

Wham, Blang thank you man

At the Museum of Modern Art in New York, they have just held three focus groups around Roy Lichtenstein's painting Keds, a pair of baseball boots on a yellow, zig-zag background.

Pop art guru Lichtenstein dies aged 73

Roy Lichtenstein, a pioneer of the Pop Art movement best known for his oversized comic book-like images, died last night. He was 73. Morgan Spangle, director of the Leo Castelli Gallery, which has represented Lichtenstein since 1962, said the artist died at the New York University Medical Center. He had been in hospital for several weeks suffering from an undisclosed illness and died of pneumonia.

Science Museum buys Warhol's Old Sparky

An electric chair once owned by pop artist Andy Warhol yesterday sold at auction for pounds 4,800. In a few minutes brisk and tense bidding, London's Science Museum secured the chair over an anonymous telephone bidder from California in the sale at Bristol Auction Rooms.

Hockney paints a birthday reunion

The artist (left), 60 in July, is marking the occasion by showing portraits of his family and friends which must be sold together. Ros Wynne- Jones discovers why

VISUAL ARTS Popoccultural South London Gallery

It's difficult to remember the time before popular culture got beached by Melvyn Bragg on the South Bank and became tired by staying up way past its bedtime for Late Review. Pop culture has been successfully toilet trained. We have grown up with the idea of it as something to be decoded, deconstructed and generally decontaminated of its energy and aura.

Brave new worlds

In the final extract from his 'History of British Art', Andrew Graham-Dixon looks at Pop, an act of homage to the post-war era

If you don't fancy visiting an art gallery, let it to come to you

Sarah Jane Checkland on the first computerised picture show

Edinburgh Festival / Day 8: Side View

JAMES HOLMES on performing without his anorak, indeed without any clothes at all, in Gee Wow] The Life and Times of Clive Neon: Warhol Superstar . . .

Edinburgh Festival Day 1: Reviews: Gee] Wow] The life and times of Clive Neon: Warhol superstar

Stephen Dinsdale, the author of last year's surprise Edinburgh and London success Anorak of Fire, has reassembled his creative team for a sequel. The result is a cherry-sweet fantasy about a radish-packer, shot to fame and fortune after meeting Andy Warhol. An authentic pop art atmosphere is created by the Lou Reed soundtrack, transvestite monologues and a startling Warhol lookalike wig. A soft heart, however, is supplied by James Holmes's pucker-lipped Brummie, a grub who hatches into Warhol's favourite butterfly. Holmes still has enough energy left for a gutsy I-wannabe-me epilogue that gets him out of the pop art pickle in time for the curtain call.

Exhibition of Hockney drawings

David Hockney at an exhibition of his drawings which opens on Wednesday at Salts Mill, Saltaire, near Bradford Hockney's new show, page 3.

Captain Moonlight: Warhol soup

TOUCHING, really. Visitors to the grave of Andy Warhol have taken to leaving tins of Campbell's soup on it. Unopened. One of Warhol's brothers has to keep clearing them away. He should leave them. Perhaps they could be stacked into a giant pyramid, like they have in supermarkets. I think Andy would have liked it that way.

Obituary: Ern Brooks

Ernest Brooks, painter and illustrator: born Manchester 24 November 1911; died 24 July 1993.
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