News William Blake: The 19th-century poet is not the author of 'Two Sunflowers Move into the Yellow Room'

Misattribution of verse started by students on internet is finally corrected by blogger

Album: Armonico Consort, Naked Byrd Two (Signum Classics)

This splendid second volume in the Armonico Consort's Naked Byrd series continues the punning tradition of a cappella versions of choral pieces by composers who, in the words of the Consort's artistic director Christopher Monks, "wore their hearts on their sleeves".

Lives Remembered: Tom Lubbock

Further to your obituary of Tom Lubbock (10 January), Tom's championship of the painter he regarded as Britain's most important Modernist, Wyndham Lewis, will not be forgotten, writes Paul Edwards, Trustee, the Wyndham Lewis Memorial Trust. Encountering the paintings first in reproduction in a public library in his youth, he was overwhelmed: "I had no idea images could be so glutting: the unimaginably gorgeous colours, the unfathomable imagery, the sharp and eliding textures, that electric line drawing." (Independent, 13 February 2005). Tom understood Lewis's work from the inside, sensing its relation to caricature, fascinated also by its almost Jacobean preoccupation with the metaphysical aspects of mortality: Red Figures Carrying Babies and Visiting Graves and One of the Stations of the Dead were two of his favourite paintings; the latter he listed in The Independent as one of the 10 greatest paintings in the UK, devoting a "Great Works" essay to it, as well. Only Tom could have noticed both its allusion to Thomas Browne's melancholy meditation Urn Burial and its more prosaic evocation of the London Underground.

Rachel Kneebone: Lamentations, White Cube, Hoxton Square, London

It's a gloomy world that Rachel Kneebone has created at White Cube. The walls are painted in shades of grey, dark and brooding in the downstairs gallery and paler upstairs, the paint streaked in rain or tears. Kneebone makes extremely complex, delicate porcelain sculptures that teem with confusing, writhing tiny body parts arranged like urns or wreaths: a leg here, a penis or vagina there, and twisting forms that look as though they could be vines or spinal chords. Pieces of bodies in a horrific jumble. The sculptures are at times hideous visions that present bodies in states of fear, sadness and horror.

Modern Poetry in Translation (Series 3 No 13): Polyphony, ed David and Helen Constantine

Some excellent short essays in this volume help to explain the nature of translation and its problems and challenges, almost as well as do the translated poems, laid side by side with their originals. My favourite was Sasha Dugdale's account of translating William Blake into Russian with a group of students in a town just outside Moscow. How to get across the sense of a self-taught poet at odds with tradition? Dugdale struggles with their lack of reverence for the originals, and one woman's rewriting of "The Sick Rose" almost breaks Dugdale's heart.

Richard Wright: A different frame of mind

Richard Wright's fresco on the walls of Tate Britain won him the Turner Prize – and as two new shows demonstrate, he's still finding beauty by thinking beyond the canvas

My Name is Mina, By David Almond

A slick return to Almond’s young heroine

The Existential Detective, By Alice Thompson

An uncanny mix of art and science

Great works: The Dance of Albion (circa 1795), William Blake

British Museum, London

With just two months to go, when will the internet election take off?

The man behind Obama's online campaign tells Ian Burrell where British parties can up their game

Album: Ray Wylie Hubbard, A. Enlightenment B. Endarkenment (Hint: There Is No C) (Bordello)

The arresting title drolly indicates the almost Manichean worldview espoused by Ray Wylie Hubbard, grizzled veteran of the Texas singer-songwriter scene.

William Blake: Tortured visions

Michael Glover takes a close look at the William Blake etchings purchased by the Tate this week

Tate buys Blake etchings for the nation

A group of bleak and morbid etchings by William Blake has been saved for the nation after £441,000 was raised by the Tate gallery. The hand-coloured works are prints of images that were created by Blake, who lived from 1757 to 1827, for three of his "illuminated books" (which fused the visual and the literary).

The Leisure Society, St Giles Church, London

This is the most nervous I've been in a church since my first communion," admits Nick Hemming, shaky but among friends for the Leisure Society's last, sold-out gig of the year, in the beautiful Soho chapel where John Wesley once preached and William Blake prayed. For once, the venue isn't an affectation, fitting their English chamber-country, with strings, flute and, tonight, a choir.

My Secret Life: Steve Coogan, Comedian, 44

My parents were ... compassionate, liberal. My father worked for IBM. My mother raised us kids. There were six of us, and a couple of extra foster kids at any given time.

Out of this world: The Museum of Everything

The Museum of Everything sounds a pompous name for a new gallery. But the Outsider Art it shows is disturbing and memorable, says Tom Lubbock
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
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Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

The President came the nearest he has come yet to rivalling George W Bush’s gormless reaction to 9/11 , says Robert Fisk
Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

A Christian charity’s efforts to save missionaries trapped in Africa by the crisis have been justifiably praised. But doubts remain about its evangelical motives
Jeremy Clarkson 'does not see a problem' with his racist language on Top Gear, says BBC

Not even Jeremy Clarkson is bigger than the BBC, says TV boss

Corporation’s head of television confirms ‘Top Gear’ host was warned about racist language
Nick Clegg the movie: Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise

Nick Clegg the movie

Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise
Philip Larkin: Misogynist, racist, miserable? Or caring, playful man who lived for others?

Philip Larkin: What will survive of him?

Larkin's reputation has taken a knocking. But a new book by James Booth argues that the poet was affectionate, witty, entertaining and kind, as hitherto unseen letters, sketches and 'selfies' reveal
Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?

Waxing lyrical

Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?
Texas forensic astronomer finally pinpoints the exact birth of impressionism

Revealed (to the minute)

The precise time when impressionism was born
From slow-roasted to sugar-cured: how to make the most of the British tomato season

Make the most of British tomatoes

The British crop is at its tastiest and most abundant. Sudi Pigott shares her favourite recipes
10 best men's skincare products

Face it: 10 best men's skincare products

Oscar Quine cleanses, tones and moisturises to find skin-savers blokes will be proud to display on the bathroom shelf
Malky Mackay allegations: Malky Mackay, Iain Moody and another grim day for English football

Mackay, Moody and another grim day for English football

The latest shocking claims do nothing to dispel the image that some in the game on these shores exist in a time warp, laments Sam Wallace
La Liga analysis: Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Pete Jenson starts his preview of the Spanish season, which begins on Saturday, by explaining how Fifa’s transfer ban will affect the Catalans
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape