William Blake

The top ten unanswered questions in songs

This was Alan Robertson's idea. He noted that 'War, huh, what is it good for?' and 'Where are the clowns?' were both answered, but that 'Scaramouche, Scaramouche, will you do the fandango?' was not. This has been the most popular Top 10 to date, attracting hundreds of nominations…

Refreshing watercolours

Tate Britain's new exhibition seeks to shake off watercolour's fusty exterior and reveal the dynamic, contemporary medium beneath. But will it wash?

Rachel Kneebone: Lamentations, White Cube, Hoxton Square, London

It's a gloomy world that Rachel Kneebone has created at White Cube. The walls are painted in shades of grey, dark and brooding in the downstairs gallery and paler upstairs, the paint streaked in rain or tears. Kneebone makes extremely complex, delicate porcelain sculptures that teem with confusing, writhing tiny body parts arranged like urns or wreaths: a leg here, a penis or vagina there, and twisting forms that look as though they could be vines or spinal chords. Pieces of bodies in a horrific jumble. The sculptures are at times hideous visions that present bodies in states of fear, sadness and horror.

Richard Wright: A different frame of mind

Richard Wright's fresco on the walls of Tate Britain won him the Turner Prize – and as two new shows demonstrate, he's still finding beauty by thinking beyond the canvas

Recreated: the exhibition that broke William Blake

When William Blake began orchestrating his first solo exhibition in London in March 1809, showcasing what he thought were his most important works of art, he hoped the world would instantly hail him as a British Raphael or Michelangelo.

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