News William Blake: The 19th-century poet is not the author of 'Two Sunflowers Move into the Yellow Room'

Misattribution of verse started by students on internet is finally corrected by blogger

Obituary: Steven Sykes

STEVEN SYKES is best known for his jewel-like Gethsemane Chapel at the east end of Coventry Cathedral, made during 1959-60. It was a commission from the cathedral's architect, Basil Spence, who like Sykes had served as a camouflage officer during the Second World War. Sykes's artistic career was difficult to pin down chiefly because he fitted uneasily into any neat progressive history of post-war art.

The Critics: The greatest love story ever told

The week in radio

Arts: Classical: A rapt repose

PHILHARMONIA/ ESCHENBACH RFH, LONDON

Books: Capturing both soil and starlight

Michael Glover recommends poetry books for children

Letter: Jerusalem has the real glory

Sir: I welcome the referendum being conducted by the (English) RFU about the possible replacement of the British national anthem by an English anthem for the England rugby team at future internationals.

Children's Books: Visionary angels on a bloody earth o

Nicholas Tucker welcomes a new challenge to gloomy teenage fare

HOW WE MET: SIR STEPHEN TUMIM AND WASFI KANI

Sir Stephen Tumim, 68, has been a barrister, a judge, and most notably Chief Inspector of Prisons from 1987 until 1995. Principal of St Edmund Hall, Oxford, for the last two years, he is President of the Royal Literary Fund and is also writing a book about William Blake. He lives with his wife in London. The conductor Wasfi Kani, 42, was born in London of Indian parents. She read music at Oxford, then worked in the City for 10 years. In 1988 she founded Pimlico Opera, a company whose work has included music-theatre in prisons, as well as professional opera at Garsington. This year she launched Grange Park Opera in the dilapidated orangery of Lord Ashburton's Hampshire estate

Dance: Pity you missed the party, Madam

SIX MONTHS is far too long for a major company to go dark on its core audience. And I'm sure The Royal Ballet wished it otherwise, especially during a period when we sorely needed reminding how good it can be. Currently homeless, the company even managed to turn up late for its founder's 100th birthday, in a short Barbican season 10 days after the event. Sadly, Dame Ninette de Valois was unable to be there (worn out from whooping it up elsewhere, it was said).

Arts: Tears and fury: the Ginsberg beat goes on

A year after his death, the life and work of one of the prime movers in the culture of dissent was celebrated by his friends.

Literature: And the Beat goes on

How are we to remember Allen Ginsberg (right)? As the man who single-handedly brought the Beats into being? Or as the man "who dreamt and made incarnate gaps in Time & Space through images juxtaposed", to steal from "Howl" - his wake-up call to the world, that's been stretching lungs and minds ever since 1956? When it comes to commemorating the dead, poems beat prosaic epitaphs any day. The official UK celebration of the hipster's life and work, held a little over a month after the first anniversary of his death from cancer, should be mercifully short on sentimental speeches. Instead, five well-chosen poets will read his verse - and some of their own - highlighting the points of connection.

Books: The trouble with Blake

THE BEAST IN THE NURSERY by Adam Phillips, Faber pounds 14.99

Books: Love Letters To Lady Lazarus

Elegy, rhapsody, exculpation, exorcism - Ted Hughes's poems for Sylvia Plath will be endlessly debated. What's already clear is their brilliance

The Weasel: Force 10 - Fence blows down again. Weasel retires to bed with copy of Bleak House.

One possible reason for Margaret Thatcher's uncharacteristic support for the new British Library, which ended up costing pounds 511 million, emerged the other day when I saw Michael Portillo popping in there. After all, unemployed ex-ministers have to pass the time somewhere. (I think it was Mr Portillo's first visit, because I saw him being directed to the cloakroom, so it should be at least a couple of years before the memoirs appear.) Sad to relate, Lady T has not yet found time to pay a visit to this palace of learning. I was shown round by the same genial BL guide who whizzed me through the old joint in Bloomsbury exactly a year ago. "The new building has a 200-year lifespan," he explained in an effort to justify the mind- boggling price-tag. "The average Tesco superstore costs pounds 40 million and has an estimated life of 15-20 years. For the price of 13 Tescos, you have a national library."

Arts: Hughes breaks silence with secret poems to Sylvia Plath

The Poet Laureate, Ted Hughes, today breaks his silence over the life and suicide of his first wife, Sylvia Plath, with a volume of poems that few knew existed. Clare Garner reports on the poetic account of his days with Plath.

Obituary: Buxton Orr

Buxton Daeblitz Orr, composer: born Glasgow 18 April 1924; married 1955 Isabelle Roberts (marriage dissolved), 1968 Jean Latimer; died Hereford 27 December 1997.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
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Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

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Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices
Could our smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases via Health Kit and Google Fit?

Could smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases?

Health Kit and Google Fit have been described as "the beginning of a health revolution"
Ryanair has turned on the 'charm offensive' but can we learn to love the cut-price carrier again?

Can we learn to love Ryanair again?

Four recent travellers give their verdicts on the carrier's improved customer service
Billionaire founder of Spanx launches range of jeans that offers

Spanx launches range of jeans

The jeans come in two styles, multiple cuts and three washes and will go on sale in the UK in October
10 best over-ear headphones

Aural pleasure: 10 best over-ear headphones

Listen to your favourite tracks with this selection, offering everything from lambskin earmuffs to stainless steel
Commonwealth Games 2014: David Millar ready to serve up gold for his beloved Scotland in the end

Commonwealth Games

David Millar ready to serve up gold for his beloved Scotland in the end
UCI Mountain Bike World Cup 2014: Downhill all the way to the top for the Atherton siblings

UCI Mountain Bike World Cup

Downhill all the way to the top for the Atherton siblings
Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star