News William Blake: The 19th-century poet is not the author of 'Two Sunflowers Move into the Yellow Room'

Misattribution of verse started by students on internet is finally corrected by blogger

Yes, the young have always managed

THE FUTURE arrives faster these days, and in greater quantity. Someone once remarked that the trouble with history was that there was so much of it; now it is the future that is too much with us. You can hardly spit without hitting a think-tank, forecasting centre or policy institute predicting the impact of information technology and the new mobility of international capital. This is probably wise - better to be warned and, if necessary, armed against the day after tomorrow than to have it strike you sharply on the head - and it is not inevitably bad news. Last week Geoff Mulgan, of the Demos think-tank, could be seen on television and read in the Independent being cheery about the stresses caused by the rise of the global market. History has taught us, said Mr Mulgan, that the stress will produce great creativity, especially in the young.

LETTERS : Sea of Faith covers a broad church

From Mr David Boulton Sir: Peter Mullen ("Cupitt's arrows lie blunted by the reality of reasoned discussion", 31 December) assumes that theological "non-realism" and what he calls "Sea-of-Faithism" are one and the same. In fact, the Sea of Faith network embraces a broader philosophical and theological spectrum including but by no means confined to the Cupittian "non-realism" which so troubles Mr Mullen.

LEADING ARTICLE:A change of view for the Independent

Alert readers will note something new at the top of the page on which this item appears today. The Independent has moved, from City Road to the 18th floor of 1 Canada Square, otherwise known as the Canary Wharf tower, England's tallest building.

Faith and Reason: 'Everything that lives is holy': Two centuries on from the completion of William Blake's Songs of Innocence and Experience, Maryanne Traylen examines the light that recent writing on the link between science and spirituality sheds on Blake's own philosophy

THIS YEAR marks the 200th anniversary of William Blake's Songs of Innocence and Experience. Blake's poetic philosophy manifests a lifelong opposition to dualism. Dualism for Blake was perpetrated by that 'mechanistic' frame of mind which is unable to see things in their God-given entirety. It splits a 'subject' from its 'object', whereas in heaven these two were meant to be one.

CHILDREN'S BOOKS / Old haunts, and dances with elves: Nicholas Tucker on a grisly clutch of children's stories, full of ghosts, kidnappers and cliffhangers

ALAS, poor ghosts] Driven out of adult literature by the sceptical, psychological age in which we live, they tend now to be relegated mainly to children's books. And even here they are often only a shadow of their former selves.

Classical Music / Double Play: Divine banality

Tavener: Ikon of Light; Two Hymns to the Mother of God; Today the Virgin; The Tiger; The Lamb; Eonia - The Sixteen, members of the Duke Quartet / Harry Christophers (Collins Classics 14052)

BOOK REVIEW / A meeting with the last of the Muggletonians: Witness against the beast: William Blake and the Moral Law - by E P Thompson, Cambridge pounds 17.95

THAT William Blake was self-taught 'terrified' T S Eliot. Here, alarmingly, was a major poet who was 'not compelled to acquire any other education in literature than that he wanted it'. Hence Blake's free way with tradition, as in the annotation to a crowded design for The Last Judgement:

Faith and Reason: A plunge into the fathomless depth: Peter Mullen, a writer on religious affairs, considers the enlightenment and frustration that St Augustine's teaching has provided for believers and sceptics alike. Next week we start a new series on Christian attitudes to the purpose of sex.

ST AUGUSTINE's Day on 28 August reminds us not only of a great intellect from Christian antiquity but it draws our attention again to theological arguments that have never been far from the centre of controversy.

TELEVISION / Pop opera

'WE CAN all discuss the relative merits of Domingo, Kiri Te Kanawa and Nigel Kennedy,' said Evelyn Glennie at the beginning of her new series Soundbites (BBC 2). Oh yeah? Who y'all calling we? I would, with some nervousness, venture money on being able to have a conversation about Domingo's diet, Kiri's dress-sense and Nige's spray-painted BMW in the local pub but you'd have to give very good odds to tempt me on anything more high-minded than that. Still, it is virtually obligatory for cultural popularisers to be blindly optimistic about the public appetite for art and this could be forgiven as innocent exuberance, entirely fitting for a series which will attempt to bring classical music to a wider audience. Only a Tex Avery cartoon separates this in the schedules from Def II, the BBC's entertainingly didactic pitch at the 'I'm not a bloody kid anymore' audience, which perhaps explains something of the determinedly cheerful style.

Letter: Single issue that affects all mankind

Sir: It has become fashionable to denigrate those who promote a single issue ('Were we conned?', 16 January), but as William Blake pointed out many years ago, 'General good is the plea of the scoundrel', and 'He who would do good to another must do it in minute particulars.'

Anthology set for English tests gets hostile reception: Schools receive compulsory texts for 14-year-olds as teachers protest and actors give help with Shakespeare

ALL 14-YEAR-OLDS in state schools will have to answer questions on a collection of poems and extracts from plays and literature ranging from Dickens to the Caribbean writer Samuel Selvon in national tests this summer.

ROCK / Ever-increasing circles: Julian Cope, new antiquarian, talks to Kevin Jackson about setting stones in rock

DEVOTEES of Wayne's World - a body which, judging by the latest box-office returns, appears to be made up of about half the population of the Western hemisphere - may recall the scene when our young friends Wayne and Garth go backstage after an Alice Cooper gig. Part timid, part gleeful, they expect to witness the standard-issue debauchery of cocaine, groupies and the lash, but are greeted by something less predictable: a scholarly lecture from Mr Cooper on the political history of Milwaukee and the derivation of the town's name from a Native American term. 'Boy]' breathes Wayne, 'You guys really know how to party]'
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